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Int Committee of the Red Cross  On the ground in over 80 countries, providing humanitarian aid to victims of war and conflict.

Imagine going one day without clean #water. This is the reality of thousands of people in Central African Republic.
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But here at the Lazarus Camp, whether it’s via trucking or pumping systems, we do our best to keep the water flowing. 💧🚰
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📸: @christophe__da_silva/ ICRC
#icrc #redcross #humanitarian #aid #centralafricanrepublic #everydayafrica #children #waterislife

#tbt to 1973. The Arab-Israeli conflict. A family submits a tracing application. For 150 years, we’ve been working to reunite families separated by conflict.
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📸: Françoise Bory/ICRC #icrc #redcross #redcrescent #throwbackthursday #family

“They said that there was another bomb, so I laid low and began to crawl. As I crawled, I realized that my body was pierced in many places, and I continued until I hid in the nearby bush.”
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Yabintu suffered injuries to her legs, arm and head after an explosion in a market where she sells food in her home town of Konduga, Nigeria. She is receiving treatment in a specialist ward for gunshot and bomb blast wounds run by the ICRC at a hospital in Maiduguri.
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“Many (women) have lost their husbands and they do not have a means of livelihood. If you go out, you get killed. And if you stay at home, there is nothing for you to eat.”
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The Lake Chad region – Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon, Chad – has been ripped apart by conflict. Civilians have been targeted and killed, and over 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. Millions more are in need of food, water, shelter and access to health care.
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Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
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To see more from the A Woman’s War project @natgeo, click link in profile. Photos by @hammond_robin #icrc #redcross #redcrescent #nigeria #maiduguri #hospital

Repost from @natgeo - Photo by @Hammond_Robin for @ICRC | In northeastern Nigeria, merely going to work can be an act of bravery. 29 year old nurse Nafisa (pictured) who works in an ICRC supported hospital learnt yesterday just how risky her work is. It has been announced that her colleague, 24-year-old Hauwa Mohammed Liman, a health worker, who had been abducted in March was killed by her captors. Another health worker abducted at the same time, Saifura Hussaini Ahmed Khorsa was killed in September. A third is still held captive. The ICRC made sustained and committed efforts to secure the release of the health-care workers, including a last-minute plea for mercy on Sunday to the Islamic State West Africa Province group, to no avail.
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Nafisa is familiar with the violence that has rocked the region. She works in a specialist gunshot and bomb blast wounded ward set up and run by the ICRC in the State Specialist Hospital in Maiduguri. Everyday she stitches wounds and plugs gaping wounds of men and women who’ve experienced first hand the destructive force of sharp exploding metal.
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Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
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This work was supported by the International Committee of the Red Cross, a humanitarian organization working on all sides of conflict to alleviate people’s suffering. To see more from the A Woman’s War project, go to @ICRC.

Hauwa’s murder has broken our hearts.
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Hauwa was a friend, a daughter, a sister - and deeply loved by many. She was a midwife in northern Nigeria when she was abducted over seven months ago. She helped women in their most painful and vulnerable moments, bringing life into the world.
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Hauwa was not yet 25. We will never know what her life would go on to hold.
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For more information on her death, see our link in bio.

Sara Ali, 27, a mother of 6, poses in the room of her missing husband in front of a blanket her mother gave her as a wedding present. “We were living in fear of shrapnel scattering outwards from rockets,” Sara says, recalling the intensity of the fighting. As the family fled, the men were separated from the women and children. Sara hasn’t seen her husband since. “Now, he is missing. It is better to live under the siege than to lose my husband.”
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With the end of combat operations, Iraq is hoping to break the cycles of violence that reach back to the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. These conflicts have caused immense suffering for civilians: millions have fled their homes, livelihoods have been destroyed and large numbers have been killed and wounded.
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Eight months after fleeing, Sara and her children returned home. The house had been looted. “The situation is intolerable and I hope my husband will come back and we live together,” Sara says. “Now we have nothing to live on.”
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Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
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To see more from A Woman’s War project at @natgeo, visit link in profile. Photo by @Hammond_Robin #icrc #redcross #redcrescent #iraq #mother

“My hope is to be able to finish school so I can help Umi (mother) and my siblings,” says 15-year-old Jalila from the evacuation centre that is now her home.
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Her infectious smile betrays the trauma from the war she has fled in her hometown of Marawi in the Philippines. Jalila fled with her parents and most of her siblings, and now stays at an evacuation centre in nearby Saguiaran. One of her sisters was separated from them when they fled. “It’s painful for us to lose a sibling,” she says. “We got separated - I haven’t seen her since the war started.” Jalila fears for her safety, and while in the camp, her stepfather was arrested — suspected as being a member of the opposition armed group.
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For nearly five decades, the Philippine government has been engaged in armed conflicts in the southern region of Mindanao with several armed groups. The prolonged conflicts, rooted deeply in disputes over land, political and religious ideology, resulted in thousands of people being killed, with many more enduring repeated displacement and hardship.
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“The best thing that could happen here in the evacuation centre would be meeting new friends and meeting long lost relatives,” says Jalila.
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Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
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To see more from the A Woman’s War project @natgeo, click link in profile. Photos by @hammond_robin #icrc #redcross #redcrescent #girl #philippines #marawi

“Iraqi people have suffered a lot. I imagine that within a decade from now, I will work as a teacher and talk to students about past wars in Iraq.”
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Rana Khalid, 16, stands before the curtain at the entrance of her school in Ramadi. She fled her home with her family when the city became the front line of the fighting. They were displaced for two years before it was safe to return. .
With the end of combat operations, Iraq is hoping to break the cycles of violence that reach back to the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. These conflicts have caused immense suffering for civilians: millions have fled their homes, livelihoods have been destroyed and large numbers have been killed and wounded.
.
Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
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To see more from the A Woman’s War project @natgeo, visit link in profile. Photo by @Hammond_Robin #ICRC #redcross #redcrescent #iraq #school #student

Luzmila is fighting for justice -and answers- regarding the disappearance of her son Beto. Today, over 20,000 people are still missing in Peru due to the armed conflict in the 80s and 90s. Check out our Instagram story for more.☝🏼
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Photo by @hammond_robin @natgeo #icrc #redcross #redcrescent

“I am a victim and I am a survivor.”
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Eufemia Cullamat, 57, is advocating to end mining companies’ activities on her ancestral lands in Surigao del Sur province in Mindanao, Philippines. Indigenous people here are confronted by harassment and displacement from their native lands. Hundreds of families opted to leave their communities and homes for other areas.
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For nearly five decades, the Philippine government has been engaged in armed conflicts in the southern region of Mindanao with several armed groups. The prolonged conflicts, rooted deeply in disputes over land, political and religious ideology, resulted in thousands of people being killed, with many more enduring repeated displacement and hardship.
.
Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
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To see more from A Woman’s War project @natgeo, see link in profile. Photo by @Hammond_Robin #ICRC. #redcross #redcrescent #women

Classrooms destroyed.
A school littered with unexploded weapons of war. Studying on donated desks.
Beating the odds.
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In countries affected by war, girls are 2.5x more likely to be out of school than boys.
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The determination at Al-Raja School for Girls is amazing. #DayOfTheGirl
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📸: @hammond_robin /#icrc #redcross #redcrescent #iraq #girl #student
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"We both started crying when we heard each other’s voice."
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Reunited with her mother more than 18 months after their village was attacked, Fatima, now 17, is one of the lucky ones. She remembers the night they were attacked. “We hid in a room, the sound of gunshots coming closer. Stray bullets penetrating our roof. We covered ourselves with mattress and cried for help." In the chaos that followed, she hid in the bush and was separated from her mother. Our team helped find her aunt and was eventually able to reunite her with her mother. “My hope for the future," she says, "is to return to our homes in peace.”
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The Lake Chad region – Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon, Chad – has been ripped apart by conflict. Civilians have been targeted and killed, and over 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. Millions more are in need of food, water, shelter and access to health care.
.
Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
.
To see more from A Woman’s War project with @natgeo, visit link in profile. Photo by @Hammond_Robin #dayofthegirl #ICRC #redcross #redcrescent

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