heathkillen heathkillen

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Heath Killen  Old Future / New Ruins. Also @inwildair, @the.territories, and @theotheratlas.

http://heathkillen.com/

I can't say much about the big project that I'm finishing up this week other than the fact that it's about walking tracks here in the Blue Mountains. I can however share little teasers featuring some of the design, research, and copywriting I've done - hopefully with the rest to come before the end of the year.

I can't say much about the big project that I'm finishing up this week other than the fact that it's about walking tracks here in the Blue Mountains. I can however share little teasers featuring some of the design, research, and copywriting I've done - hopefully with the rest to come before the end of the year.

I can't say much about the big project that I'm finishing up this week other than the fact that it's about walking tracks here in the Blue Mountains. I can however share little teasers featuring some of the design, research, and copywriting I've done - hopefully with the rest to come before the end of the year.

Opening today in the @hotel_hotel cabinets is Rainbow's End - an exhibition I've curated featuring objects from Australia's possible furure by @fredfowler, @floralsculptures, @lianerossler, @dale.hardiman, @peacheyandmosig, @hellegoosey, @kevinajosmith, Kate Rhode, @rmb352, Valerie Restarick and @gracewooddesignstudio + @seantran of @ateliershhorn. Rainbow's End imagines what Australia might look like towards the end of this century if we continue down our current path. A post apocalyptic dystopia or a glorious new Eden?

Rainbow's End - an exhibition I've developed for the @hotel_hotel cabinets will be on display from this Saturday. Rainbow's End imagines what Australia might look like towards the end of this century if we continue down our current path. A post apocalyptic dystopia or a glorious new Eden? These and other possible futures will be explored in objects such as this extraordinary funeral mask by @fredfowler. Come to Canberra and see astonishing visions of tomorrow by @floralsculptures, @lianerossler, @dale.hardiman, @peacheyandmosig, @hellegoosey, @kevinajosmith, Kate Rhode, @rmb352, Valerie Restarick and @gracewooddesignstudio + @seantran of @ateliershhorn.

Safety Goggles with Etui by @hellegoosey for Rainbow's End, an exhibition exploring Australia's possible futures, showing at the @hotel_hotel cabinets from August 12 — September 13 • The Safety Goggles with Etui come from a small tribe living on the border of remnant rainforest and open grassland in subtropical Australia. They identify themselves as custodians of this country and believe their preservation and regeneration is of utmost importance to the survival of the human race. Some senior members of the tribe have extensive knowledge and experience in medicine and botany from B.C.(before cataclysm). A few members are well known across the region as healers, especially in the treatment of mental illnesses. The forest people are subsistence farmers and very good beekeepers. Their handmade textiles, and other products made from plant material, are highly sought after and are traded with neighbouring tribes for items made from ceramics and metal. The tribe’s structure and belief systems are based on egalitarianism, rationalism, and most importantly humour.

Voting Pendant by @peacheyandmosig for Rainbow's End, an exhibition exploring Australia's possible futures, showing at the @hotel_hotel cabinets from August 12 — September 13 •"Voting pendant from a family in the southern mountainous area of what was once known as Australia. The people of the area were know to follow an ambilineal descent principal, with the pendant being passed through the family to the individual deemed best able to argue for the family interests. Each pendant equated to one vote in the larger group gatherings where territory and resources were in discussion. Families in this area were small groups of individuals who committed to share the work involved in survival. Although often related by blood this was not always the case".

Scouting Remnants by @peacheyandmosig for Rainbow's End, an exhibition exploring Australia's possible futures, showing at the @hotel_hotel cabinets from August 12 — September 13 • "The remnants of what is believed to be a kit used by scouts looking for clean water sources. It is thought that the scouts travelled in pairs for months at a time in the search for rare springs that had not been contaminated".

Jellyfish by @ateliershhorn for Rainbow's End, an exhibition exploring Australia's possible futures, showing at the @hotel_hotel cabinets from August 12 — September 13 • With a bone structure made from black walnut and a skin from silk paper, this object acts as a reminder of the subsurface effects of global warming. Where other creatures die off due to increased ocean temperatures, jellyfish do the opposite - acting as a harbinger of catastrophic ecological change.

I'm very pleased to announce Rainbow's End - an exhibition I've developed that will take place from August 12 — September 13 in the @hotel_hotel cabinets. Rainbow's End imagines what Australia might look like towards the end of this century if we continue down our current path. A post apocalyptic dystopia or a glorious new Eden? These and other possible futures will be explored by @fredfowler, @floralsculptures, @lianerossler, @dale.hardiman, @peacheyandmosig, @hellegoosey, @kevinajosmith, Kate Rhode, @rmb352, Valerie Restarick and @gracewooddesignstudio + @seantran of @ateliershhorn in a collection of antipodean artefacts that may become very real products of tomorrow's world. Come to Canberra, stay at the most unique & beautiful hotel in the country, and get a glimpse into our ecological and cultural inheritance as imagined through some visionary works of art.

I've got a little exhibition about weeds showing at @platformgalleryco from tomorrow → the end of the month. If you're in the neighbourhood at 2:30pm you'll be treated to scones with blackberry jam, nettle tea, and of course wine, all thanks to Katoomba's finest gallerist, Kelly Heylen. Weeds are a big concern here in the Blue Mountains. It's understandable given that there's an incredibly rare and precious World Heritage listed National Park to protect - but I can't help but admire these plants. They have come from foreign shores, been subjected to aggressive and repeated campaigns of eradication, and have still managed to survive in some of the most unlikely and inhospitable places. Noxious Meadows is a small tribute.

The Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is native to China, where it has been used for centuries in traditional medicines. From 1740, it started to appear around the world as a popular garden plant. Due to voracious propagation, mild toxicity, & stench - it is now classified as a noxious weed here in Australia and the USA. It is sometimes referred to on the east coast as a “ghetto palm” or “junk yard dog tree” - which should give you some idea of its cultural and botanical appreciation. In 1974, artist Isamu Noguchi purchased a disused New York gas station with the intention to turn it into a studio and living space. A single tree stood among garbage and debris on the lot. A 60ft Tree of Heaven. This tree grows where others will or can not - even in the polluted soil of an inner city auto repair shop. Noguchi must have admired the tree's tenacity and spirit because he chose to keep it. In fact he not only chose to keep it, he designed an entire sculpture garden around it. It became the centrepiece of his new home. The tree's shade provided a place under which his staff would eat their lunch and Noguchi himself could enjoy quiet reflection. Three years after his death, in 1988, Noguchi’s studio was opened to the public as a museum dedicated to his work. The tree stood. Twenty years later, in 2008, rot was discovered in the tree - perhaps due to the slow inundation of groundwater from the East River which had also damaged the site. The tree was dying and threatened to collapse on the building, which had just undergone a multi-million dollar restoration. Sadly, it had to come down. When it was removed its rings revealed it to be 75 years old. The wood was sent to the Detroit Tree of Heaven Woodshop, an artists collective who work exclusively with the genus. From the wood they made a collection of furniture which now sits throughout the museum. The tree is gone for now, but perhaps not forever. Notoriously hard to kill, this species will often send out suckers years later and regrow. Shortly after the felling, gallery director Jenny Dixon had this to say: “The ailanthus is well known for regenerating from its roots. If it revives, the original could be here again".

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