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Glenna Gordon  ⚡️Photographer seeking layers, conversations & connections 📷 Aftermath Project, 2019💥 Red Hook Editions 📚 New School 🍎

Yesterday I got some of the toughest questions I’ve ever had to attempt to answer from this fifth grade class in Washington DC. The fact that it was so hard for me to explain why I couldn’t do more for the kids I was photographing isn’t about a lack of understanding on the part of the DC fifth graders about conflict, governance, aid and media, but is actually about the collective failure of all of us to do more. Thanks for keeping it real kids and reminding me what matters most ❤️ and to the @pulitzercenter for the chance to do this work and share it in schools. PLUS THEY ASKED ME FOR MY AUTOGRAPH AND I HAVE NEVER BEEN MORE FLATTERED.

One of the best parts of preparing for panels and talks about my work is going through old hard drives and finding gems like this woman’s excellent henna ⚫️ WASHINGTON DC FRIENDS - please come by @pressclubdc on Monday night 3/4 for a panel with @pulitzercenter and @savethechildren on the lives of children during conflict.

Monday night lights.

Temperature 🔺

Decorated village 🖤

A picture of former president and convicted war criminal Charles Taylor on display at a photo studio in Monrovia in a frame with a poem about the circle of family growing stronger. Nostalgia for what never was, inflected by the price of subsidized rice, is a potent elixir.

Something new // something different // collaborating with @itsarchel

Always chasing. 2019 here we go 🌹

“There is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship. And the compelling reason for maybe choosing some sort of god or spiritual-type thing to worship–be it JC or Allah, be it YHWH or the Wiccan Mother Goddess, or the Four Noble Truths, or some inviolable set of ethical principles–is that pretty much anything else you worship will eat you alive. If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough. It’s the truth. Worship your body and beauty and sexual allure and you will always feel ugly. And when time and age start showing, you will die a million deaths before they finally grieve you. On one level, we all know this stuff already. It’s been codified as myths, proverbs, clichés, epigrams, parables; the skeleton of every great story. The whole trick is keeping the truth up front in daily consciousness.

Worship power, you will end up feeling weak and afraid, and you will need ever more power over others to numb you to your own fear. Worship your intellect, being seen as smart, you will end up feeling stupid, a fraud, always on the verge of being found out. But the insidious thing about these forms of worship is not that they’re evil or sinful, it’s that they’re unconscious. They are default settings... They’re the kind of worship you just gradually slip into, day after day, getting more and more selective about what you see and how you measure value without ever being fully aware that that’s what you’re doing... There are all different kinds of freedom, and the kind that is most precious you will not hear much talk about much in the great outside world of wanting and achieving. The really important kind of freedom involves attention and awareness and discipline, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them over and over in myriad petty, unsexy ways every day.

That is real freedom.
-David Foster Wallace, Rest In Power.

This week, James Fields, the white supremacist who drove a car into a crowd and killed Heather Heyer and injured others, was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to life in prison. But for the wider question of culpability for that day’s violence, for the massive uptick in hate crimes in America, for the perpetuation of systemic racism generation to generation, embedded in our families and our institutions—we need more complicated answers.

Women like Amanda and Erika also do the grunt work of pro-white activism. And women like Tara and Ayla follow the time-honored tradition of bringing up racist children—that #trad lifestyle they admire so much that once included taking the family out for a day’s entertainment at public lynchings. These women present outsiders with an “acceptable face” of white supremacy, a soft, palatable point of entry with the nostalgic glow of an idealized, wishfully apolitical past. This attempt to neutralize the stigma of more overt racism makes women of The Movement valuable recruiting tools, far more insidious than skinhead thugs or robed Klansmen. To understand the radicalization of white supremacy in the United States, we need to comprehend its roots as a complex, extensive ecosystem with unexpected hubs of power.

Please give a read to my piece "American Women of the Far Right" on @nybooks. Many thanks to Matt Seaton for his endless patience, and of course to @economichardship and @thenewschool for supporting this work. And, very excited to keep going, as well as seeking redemption, next year for Aftermath Project and @saraterry13. Link in bio.

More from the Colombia Venezuela border for @savechildrenuk

Great story on the impact on the Venezuelan crisis on mother’s, children and health care, by my travel companion and Spanish tutor @at.ligaze for @telegraph with @savechildrenuk
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/0/mothers-children-pay-price-venezuelas-economic-collapse/

In the scorching heat, worried mothers clutch sick children who are presenting with a mix of maladies – fevers, convulsions, skin lesions and even acute malnutrition.

But this isn't a doctor's waiting room, it's the communal area of a migrant centre in Maicao, a dusty desert city in La Guajira, a region of northern Colombia close to the border with Venezuela.

Each day, dozens of people languish here, just a handful of the estimated three million migrants who have fled Venezuela's long-running economic and political meltdown over the last few years.
The children are here and not in a doctor's office because Venezuelan migrants often don't have the papers to sign up to a Colombian insurer or the means to get to the main hospital which is more than 40 minutes walk out of town under the blazing sun.

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