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FT Weekend  Welcome to the Financial Times Weekend Instagram feed - sharing sneak peeks and photography. Have you seen our new 'How to' videos? Link 👈🏻

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A 6 second history of tech in pictures.

John Thornhill examines 'Big Tech v Big Brother: how do you view technology?' in this weekend's Life & Arts

The Spanish photographer Arnau Bach, who accompanied Peggy Hollinger to photograph Lilian Thuram and Franck Briffaut for FT's Life & Arts story 'What the legacy of France’s first black general tells us about the country’s identity' is no stranger to depicting the subject of multiculturalism in French society.
Bach shot his last project, “Capital”, in Marseille, once France’s portal to the African colonies. Arriving in December 2013, shortly after it has been designated the European Capital of Culture for 2014, he took pictures over nine months that showed a different side of the city.
“Marseille is a city of the most stunning colours,” Bach explained in an interview. “Yet life is very hard there. The city is poor and tough, dirty and sandy. I could see clearly on the faces of the people I portrayed the weight of their concerns.” © Arnau Bach

The Spanish photographer Arnau Bach, who accompanied Peggy Hollinger to photograph Lilian Thuram and Franck Briffaut for FT's Life & Arts story 'What the legacy of France’s first black general tells us about the country’s identity' is no stranger to depicting the subject of multiculturalism in French society.
Bach shot his last project, “Capital”, in Marseille, once France’s portal to the African colonies. Arriving in December 2013, shortly after it has been designated the European Capital of Culture for 2014, he took pictures over nine months that showed a different side of the city.
“Marseille is a city of the most stunning colours,” Bach explained in an interview. “Yet life is very hard there. The city is poor and tough, dirty and sandy. I could see clearly on the faces of the people I portrayed the weight of their concerns.” © Arnau Bach

The Spanish photographer Arnau Bach, who accompanied Peggy Hollinger to photograph Lilian Thuram and Franck Briffaut for FT's Life & Arts story 'What the legacy of France’s first black general tells us about the country’s identity' is no stranger to depicting the subject of multiculturalism in French society.
Bach shot his last project, “Capital”, in Marseille, once France’s portal to the African colonies. Arriving in December 2013, shortly after it has been designated the European Capital of Culture for 2014, he took pictures over nine months that showed a different side of the city.
“Marseille is a city of the most stunning colours,” Bach explained in an interview. “Yet life is very hard there. The city is poor and tough, dirty and sandy. I could see clearly on the faces of the people I portrayed the weight of their concerns.” © Arnau Bach

This week marks 80 years since the bombing of Guernica. Here's the story behind Picasso's powerful response to the atrocity. Watch the full video at ft.com/guernica

Snapshot: ‘Americans Seen’ by Sage Sohier
As a young photographer in the 1980s, Sage Sohier wandered all over Boston. She would hang out with locals until they relaxed, and then watched on as “a kind of theatre of the streets emerged from the boredom of hot summer days”.
The photo is part of Americans Seen, a new collection that is on display at Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego, until May 31, and is the subject of a monograph by Nazraeli Press. ‘Fall River, Massachusetts, 1981’ © Sage Sohier

Snapshot: ‘Americans Seen’ by Sage Sohier
As a young photographer in the 1980s, Sage Sohier wandered all over Boston. She would hang out with locals until they relaxed, and then watched on as “a kind of theatre of the streets emerged from the boredom of hot summer days”.
The photo is part of Americans Seen, a new collection that is on display at Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego, until May 31, and is the subject of a monograph by Nazraeli Press. ‘Fall River, Massachusetts, 1981’ © Sage Sohier

Snapshot: ‘Americans Seen’ by Sage Sohier
As a young photographer in the 1980s, Sage Sohier wandered all over Boston. She would hang out with locals until they relaxed, and then watched on as “a kind of theatre of the streets emerged from the boredom of hot summer days”.
The photo is part of Americans Seen, a new collection that is on display at Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego, until May 31, and is the subject of a monograph by Nazraeli Press. ‘Fall River, Massachusetts, 1981’ © Sage Sohier

Is this the end of the line for the telephone box? This is Martin Parr's 'GB. England. Ascot.' from 'Think of England', 1999. Now almost perfectly obsolete, these curious pieces of architecture remain emblems of an age that is rapidly disappearing. Find out more from our architecture critic on FT.com (Photo: © Martin Parr/@magnumphotos) #phonebox #redphonebox #england #technology #photography #martinparr #architecture

Cryopreservation is widely used in medical science for the storage of living cells such as blood, bone marrow and embryos. Whole human bodies present a far greater challenge, particularly the intricate and delicate brain. Scientists are yet to cryopreserve and reanimate a human organ successfully, but there has been limited success with animals. Last year, scientists cooled a rabbit brain to -135C. A week later, they thawed it and said its state of preservation was “uniformly excellent”. Pictured here: whiteboard planning of the project in the meeting room of Valentine's office. Photography by @maxburkhalter

For two decades, the architect Stephen Valentine has been designing, planning and developing — though not yet building — a structure quite unlike anything built before. He calls the building Timeship and describes it as a repository for the technologies and people working to stretch the boundaries of being human, a Silicon Valley for life-extension research. Photography by @maxburkhalter

From the pyramids to the Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris — the first landscaped cemetery — humans have long constructed elaborate spaces for the dead as gateways to the afterlife. For the cryopreserved, however, such architecture would be unsuitable. The small but growing number of people who pay to be preserved do so in the hope of one day waking up — death, as they see it, is a reversible state. Pictured here: a cemetery in the town of Comfort, in the Texas Hill Country. Photography by @maxburkhalter

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