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FT Weekend  Welcome to the Financial Times Weekend Instagram feed - sharing sneak peeks and photography. Our summer food & drink special is here! 👈🏻

http://ft.com/summerfood2017

Snapshot: War/PostWar by Fons Iannelli

The people in Iannelli’s photographs are not only suburban families but impoverished coal miners, caught dirt-faced, or mid-mouthful, squinting, scowling or wiping their noses.

In the exhibition War/PostWar, the sweet and untidy intimacy of these domestic shots contrasts with the gleaming, ordered aeroplanes and lines of soldiers in his earlier military photography. One of these Americas, he seems to say, paid for the other.

Fons Iannelli: War/PostWar is at the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York until August 11.

Boy Smoking Cigarette' (1946), by Fons Iannelli © Fons Iannelli

'Alice, Jim's wife, tries to keep the house clean in spite of greasy coal dust, retains a trace of vanity. Although she has never owned a toothbrush, she spends hours brushing and braiding her hip-length brown hair' (1946), by Fons Iannelli
The people in Iannelli’s photographs are not only suburban families but impoverished coal miners, caught dirt-faced, or mid-mouthful, squinting, scowling or wiping their noses. Fons Iannelli: War/PostWar is at the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York until August 11.

Snapshot: War/PostWar by Fons Iannelli

The people in Iannelli’s photographs are not only suburban families but impoverished coal miners, caught dirt-faced, or mid-mouthful, squinting, scowling or wiping their noses.

In the exhibition War/PostWar, the sweet and untidy intimacy of these domestic shots, such as “Father and Daughters Doing Dishes in Kitchen” contrasts with the gleaming, ordered aeroplanes and lines of soldiers in his earlier military photography. One of these Americas, he seems to say, paid for the other.

Fons Iannelli: War/PostWar is at the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York until August 11.

The sight of artists, scientists and engineers with their heads together, hovering over photographs and spreadsheets, evaluating the performance of newly minted films, became the norm. It was exciting and everyone learnt. The result was a confluence of art and technology. Polaroid gathered technical information and collected experimental and fine-art photographs; the chosen artists, in addition to products, received museum exhibitions, publicity, even fame. 'Los Angeles, Back Alley', Dennis Hopper (1987)

During the second world war, Polaroid developed a process that created 3D images used for coded pictures by the army and the navy. It united Land’s polarising filter with photography. After the war, the technology was no longer required for aerial reconnaissance but turned out to be perfect for 3D movies. One more step and Land was almost there. “True creativity,” he told Life, “is characterised by a succession of acts each dependent on the one before and suggesting the one after. This kind of cumulative creativity led to the development of Polaroid photography.” Pictured here: 'Everlasting Radio Wave – Test #5', Chen Wei (2008)

In an interview with Life magazine in 1972, the American scientist Edwin Land explained that he had invented one-step instant photography during a family vacation in 1944, when his daughter Jennifer had asked why she couldn’t see the pictures she had just taken “now”. Within an hour, he claimed, he had visualised the camera, film and chemistry system that could accomplish this feat. It would be another three years before he realised his vision, but a child’s question launched research that would alter the photographic landscape for decades to come. Pictured here: Barbara Crane, Private Views, 1981 © Barbara Crane

Unlike other motor sports, such as Nascar and IndyCar in the US, and Formula 2 in Europe, in which teams race similar cars, or have fixed budgets, F1 is largely bespoke. F1 “constructors” build their vehicles from scratch and can spend what they want, which has led to spiralling costs, and financial losses even among winning teams. “Don’t use words like ‘investment’ about F1 because that implies a return and there is no chance of it,” says Tony Purnell, technical director of British Cycling and a former Red Bull team principal. Photographs by @gregori_civera

F1 started out primarily as a contest of drivers, including mavericks such as Sir Stirling Moss, who raced various vehicles rather than sticking with one manufacturer. Ferrari established the principle that machine mattered more than man: whoever drove the best car would probably win. “Unless you’re in one of the top teams — Ferrari, Mercedes, Red Bull — you’re fighting to get there,” admits Romain Grosjean, 31, the Franco-Swiss driver for Haas F1. Photographs by @gregori_civera

Inside Formula One’s race for world domination: It is mindblowingly expensive, fiercely competitive and almost impossible to break into. Can the sport’s new owners broaden its appeal? Photographs by @gregori_civera

'These pancakes are particularly light and pillowy because we use coconut milk instead of cow’s milk, and because the addition of yeast to the batter makes it more like a crumpet or Lebanese atayef. Also, like atayef, they are drenched in a simple syrup as soon as they are ready — this one with a sharp and fresh lime syrup rather than orange blossom. It brings the pancakes to life and wakes up the palate.' @honeyandco share their lime and coconut pancake recipe.. Photographs by @patricianiven

‘A few slices of mango and a dollop of coconut cream make this a hero’s breakfast.' Bring on the coconut and lime pancakes... Recipe at ft.com by @honeyandco
Photographs by @patricianiven

Is this the end of restaurants as we know them? Will 'dark kitchens' transform our eating habits? Read on at ft.com/summerfood2017. Photography by @will.spoon, visuals by @emma_pud #food #takeaway #chef #kitchen #restaurant #technology #eatingin #deliveroo

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