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Fashion Revolution  A global movement calling for greater transparency in the fashion industry. Ask #WhoMadeMyClothes? 👇Read the Consumer Survey Report👇

O IS FOR OCEANS

The numbers are staggering. Every year, 8 million tonnes of plastic waste enter the oceans. At the 2017 International Coastal Cleanup, volunteers collected 1.6 million plastic bottles, 1.1 million bottle caps and more than 900,000 plastic bags. That’s a hell of a lot of non-nutritious “food” for turtles and seabirds. A plastic bottle can take 450 years to completely degrade. An abandoned nylon fishing net? Up to 600 years.

By 2050 there will be more plastic (by weight) than fish in the sea.

Could the circular economy provide the solution? Imagine designing out waste from the system. Trash becomes a resource, something valuable to be cycled endlessly back into the loop.

Those plastic bottles can become trainers or jeans. Those fishing nets can find a new life as bikinis made from recycled nylon. It is already happening. We’re a long way off a truly circular system, but it is possible. Humans are ingenious. If we can manage to create all this plastic, to warm up the Earth, to change the oceans’ chemistry, to make Crocs cool, well… we can do anything, can’t we?

Artwork by @allivanes

Written by @mrspress

Our third fanzines is an A-Z of the many ways the fashion industry impacts climate change and harms the environment. We know that clothing production doubled between 2000-2014 and the industry’s increasing reliance on fossil fuel-based polyester means that it is used in 60% of our garments. We examine the impact that the associated use of energy, water, pesticides, and chemicals is having on the environment. We take a moment to consider the complex issues and to suggest easy actions and ways we can all be the change. If you haven’t already ordered yours, you can make a difference by buying a copy by visiting our website.

#FashionRevolution #TraidFairLiveFair

N IS FOR NUMBERS “The simplest step we can take is to wear our clothes for longer. Look after them, repair them, restyle and re-invent them, swap them with friends and pass them on. Just increasing the lifespan of our clothes reduces all of their environmental impacts; for greenhouse gases “doubling the useful life of clothing from one year to two years reduces emissions over the year by 24%”, as does buying second hand clothes” – ‘Timeout for Fast Fashion’ @Greenpeace

Take a look at some of our favourite fashion fixes for creative inspiration and get started on repairing or enhancing your favourite clothes… Or better yet, why not hold a #haulternative swap party! The simplest way to extending the life of your clothes is by giving them a new owner. Head over to our latest story to watch @itsmarziapie swap clothes with @grav3yardgirl. Don’t forget to tag us in any of your #haulternative creations!

Fashion Revolution’s latest zine is an A-Z of the many ways the fashion industry impacts climate change and harms the environment. We know that clothing production doubled between 2000-2014 and the industry’s increasing reliance on fossil fuel-based polyester means that it is used in 60% of our garments. We examine the impact that the associated use of energy, water, pesticides, and chemicals is having on the environment. We take a moment to consider the complex issues and to suggest easy actions and ways we can all be the change. If you haven’t already ordered yours, you can make a difference by buying a copy by visiting our website.

#FashionRevolution #LovedClothesLast #Haulternative #TraidFairLiveFair

N IS FOR NUMBERS

Less than 1% of material used to produce clothing is recycled into new clothing. 10-20,000. The number of litres of water needed to produce 1kg of cotton. You can reduce your own carbon footprint by 700,000 tonnes of CO2 by simply reducing your washing temperature and line-drying your clothes. Small behavioural changes on a mass scale empower us all to do something positive that makes a difference.

140 million. That’s how many pounds worth of clothing the UK sends to landfill each year. It’s like throwing money into a giant hole — and these days even the plastic cash won’t biodegrade. There are so many ways to sell your clothes after you’ve finished with them. If we continue as we are, total clothing sales are estimated to reach 160 million tonnes in 2050. That’s three times the amount we are already producing which will result in catastrophic amounts of non-renewable resources and inconceivable amounts of plastic-based fibres being released into the oceans.
Artwork by @Helenatraill
Words by @Siennalula

A-Z of the many ways the fashion industry impacts climate change and harms the environment. We know that clothing production doubled between 2000-2014 and the industry’s increasing reliance on fossil fuel-based polyester means that it is used in 60% of our garments. We examine the impact that the associated use of energy, water, pesticides, and chemicals is having on the environment. We take a moment to consider the complex issues and to suggest easy actions and ways we can all be the change. If you haven’t already ordered yours, you can make a difference by buying a copy by visiting our website.

#FashionRevolution #TraidFairLiveFair

Today is Human Rights Day, a celebration that marks 70 years since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is also a day to consider how human rights are lacking for people around the world. Today we are reflecting on a recent Index by the Walk Free Foundation that highlighted the garment industry as one of the key at-risk sectors for modern slavery. Issues like human rights often seem so overwhelming that it's difficult to understand how we can make a difference and be the solution. The Global Slavery Index makes it clear that the products we buy have major implications on human livelihood around the world, and that fair fashion is a good place to start.
#FashionRevolution #LovedClothesLast #TradeFairLiveFair
#standup4humanrights #HumanRightsDay *2nd biggest at-risk sector by import £ value among G20 countries.

Next Friday is Christmas Jumper Day, which means many of us will wear a festive knit and donate to a good cause. ⁣
🎅We will spend in excess of £220 million on novelty Christmas jumpers this year, a quarter of which end up in the bin or are unlikely to be worn again. ⁣
🦌The charity shops are telling us they are overflowing with second hand Christmas jumpers right now and if you or your family are going to join the festive fun, we urge you to give twice over: buy yours from your favourite charity shop instead of buying more single use fashion.⁣
🎄 That way we can help save the children and the planet. ⁣

#whomademyclothes #fashionrevolution #lovedclotheslast

#Repost @labourbehindthelabel ・・・
The original deadline by which the courts were going to expel the Accord from Bangladesh was November 30th. The Accord has been granted one more week to continue operations in Bangladesh, until December 6th – so we have one more week to campaign. We need your help to make as much out of this extra week as possible! .
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Take action here: http://www.laborrights.org/protectprogress

M IS FOR MICROFIBRES⁣

Washing clothes releases half a million tonnes of plastic microfibres into the ocean every year, equivalent to more than 50 billion plastic bottles. - @ellenmacarthurfoundation

But what are microfibres and how do they affect us? Microfibres are found in plastic which can be found in the majority of the clothes we wear. ⁣

Polyester is the most popular fabric used for fashion and materials similar to polyester such as nylon, acrylic and polyamide contain plastic. But when garments made from these materials are washed in domestic washing machines, they shed microfibres that consequently add to the increasing levels of plastic in our oceans. ⁣

These minute thread-like microfibres then infiltrate our water systems and oceans every time we wash our clothes and because they do not biodegrade, they represent a serious threat to aquatic life. Small creatures eat the microfibres, which make their way up the food chain to fish and shellfish eaten by humans. Even these fibres are miniscule they can absorb high concentrations of poisonous substances which can end up in our bodies whenever we eat from the ocean. Microfibres have even been found in air, rivers, soil, drinking water, beer and table salt. ⁣

So, what can be done? One of the ways to tackle this plastic pollution issue is to phase out all non-essential plastic materials. But in the meantime, here are some way to reduce our clothes shedding tiny plastics. ⁣

Wash clothes at a lower heat with slower spin cycles, try 30 degrees.⁣

Use a Guppy Bag or Coraball in your washing machine. ⁣

Fill the washing machine to reduce friction between items. ⁣

And most importantly, keep clothes for longer! ⁣

#FashionRevolution #TraidFairLiveFair

Thank you @british_design for hosting an incredible week of activities to launch our partnership for global Fashion Revolutionaries. See our Instagram stories for Fashion Revolutionaries Highlight to watch the 7 Fashion Revolutionary films from around the world 🌍💚 #Repost @british_design
・・・
It’s been a busy few weeks for us! Last week in collaboration with @fash_rev we welcomed @fash_revmexico and @fash_revid to London for our Cyber Monday dinner, where we explored digital as a tool to discover global fashion revolutionaries.
We spent the week visiting London’s own Fashion Revolutionaries, including @vamuseum @royalcollegeofart @theconduitlondon @ravensbourneuk @nowgalleryse10 @materialfutures @circular.vision @helenkirkumstudio @helprefugeesuk
A big thanks to all our hosts! Keep an eye on this space to see what happens next as we continue to bring global fashion revolutionaries together to explore possibilities a sustainable future for fashion.
#bcxfashionrevolution #sustainablefashion #fashionrevolutionaries
#fashionrevolution

M IS FOR MICROFIBRES

When we think of ocean pollution we tend to think of single-use plastic, such as bottles, plastic bags and straws, but the fashion industry is responsible for a staggering one-third of all the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. Textiles are the largest source of both primary and secondary microplastics, accounting for 34.8% of global microplastic pollution.

Mostly, this comes from microfibres that shed from our synthetic clothing. Each time we wash a fleece jacket two grams of these micro killers will find their way into the sea. This has prompted Gregg Treinish, executive director of Adventure Scientist, to declare that “If you eat fish, you eat plastic”. Microfibres have been found in table salt in China, in Arctic waters and in fish and make up to 85% of human debris on shorelines across the globe. Nobody wants particles of synthetic fibres from their tracksuit bottoms to end up at the bottom of the sea. This is an issue in need of urgent action.

Artwork by @louise_fiona
Words by @siennalula & @orsoladecastro

A-Z of the many ways the fashion industry impacts climate change and harms the environment. We know that clothing production doubled between 2000-2014 and the industry’s increasing reliance on fossil fuel-based polyester means that it is used in 60% of our garments. We examine the impact that the associated use of energy, water, pesticides, and chemicals is having on the environment. We take a moment to consider the complex issues and to suggest easy actions and ways we can all be the change. If you haven’t already ordered yours, you can make a difference by buying a copy of our fanzine on our website fashionrevolution.org/resources/fanzine3

#FashionRevolution #TraidFairLiveFair

🌟RESULT🌟the Modern Slavery Act passed in Australian Parliament! Now it will be easier to understand #WhoMadeMyClothes well done to @walkfreefoundation @fash_rev_ausnz @graceaforrest and everyone involved in pushing this through 🙌 #fashionrevolution 📷 @nicolewongphoto

Following the collapse of Rana Plaza, the Bangladesh Accord was introduced in 2013 to bind global fashion brands, retailers, and trade unions in a 5-year agreement to ensure fire and building safety for garment workers.
On November 30th, that 5-year agreement is up! And, the 2018 Transition Accord, which is the Bangladesh government's replacement proposal, lacks some of the core promises of the initial Accord, which could endanger worker safety and wellbeing.

Have your say! You can show your solidarity with @cleanclothescampaign sign the petition at https://actionnetwork.org/letters/keep-workers-safe-in-bangladesh 📷 kristof_vadino

#protectprogress #RanaPlazaNeverAgain #FashionRevolution #WhoMadeMyClothes

R.I.P Bernardo Bertolucci and grazie for your support. Ciao Bernardo 💔🙏

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