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Architectural Digest  The International Design Authority.

After gutting a 10,000-square-foot property in London’s Notting Hill neighborhood, Eiesha Bharti Pasricha (@eieshabp) was introduced to @charlesmellersh, a former interiors editor at @wallpapermag, who today runs his own design studio. “I loved that Charles’s background was in journalism. His knowledge and appreciation of design goes deep,” Bharti Pasricha says. “He listened and never forced his ideas on me.” They talked and they traveled—a lot. Impressively, no two pieces in any room are from the same designer, dealer, or source. “My process is organic and intuitive—more like a gentle game of tennis than something prescriptive,” Mellersh explains. “Eiesha has a really well-informed eye but is also wonderfully open to learning.” In the powder room, a wallpaper by @timorous_beasties and beadboard paneling painted in @farrowandball’s Green Smoke wrap the walls. Visit the link in our profile to see the rest of the home. Photo by @paulraeside; text by @hugomacd; styled by @michaelreynoldsnyc

When a young couple tapped interior designer @monarossberman to bring character to their lackluster corner office, neither party expected to dive headfirst into a multiyear overhaul of the Philadelphia home. At the time, the owners hadn’t considered their long-term design dreams for the contemporary abode in Society Hill, but as Berman began injecting her signature blend of warmth and whimsy into the ground-floor work space, a grander vision began to take shape. “Halfway through that room we decided to do the whole house,” recalls Berman, who proceeded to guide her clients through an extensive gut renovation that would transform the property, inside and out. Berman knows a thing or two about embracing the urge to start fresh. She learned its value firsthand when she pivoted from an early law career to embrace her creative calling—the shift eventually led to the launch her firm, and it certainly equipped her to turn this outdated townhouse into a sophisticated, highly customized retreat with surprises at every turn. Her effortless execution of the office makeover inspired large-scale adjustments throughout the entire home, including a custom-fabricated butler’s pantry and a stunning three-story glass staircase. Pictured here is a dramatic single-pivot door fronted with marble and brass that leads guests from the exterior courtyard into a color-splashed foyer. Berman doesn’t shy away from featuring loud tones—cherry-red lacquer tops a console table with a concave, mirrored face, and more exuberant hues pop from the Joan Miró painting above. A woven leather rug by @hollandandsherryinteriors warms up the poured-concrete floor. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @richardpowersphoto; text by @hldoolin

Nobody can tell the story of an epic renovation project quite like the homeowner herself. Fortunately, in the February issue of AD, that homeowner is none other than TV impresario @shondarhimes, who is an award-winning storyteller for her hit TV shows @greysabc, @scandalabc, @howtogetawaywithmurder, etc. Here, Rhimes details the five-year renovation that transformed an “ugly, wrong house” into her dream family home: “I’d had the opportunity to visit the White House residence during the Obama era, and I had been impressed by how warm, comfortable, and elegant it was. I was especially enthusiastic about President Obama’s private office—the colors, the style, the vibe. I wanted to sit and write in there. (I didn’t.) Anyone who can make a writer feel more like writing is someone special. That ability to connect with whatever creates sparks in a person is part of what makes @michaelsmithinc such a gifted designer. Working with him was a truly collaborative experience. Despite my lack of time, I ended up being deeply involved in the process. The home we’ve created feels classic California—if a little bit romantic... I wanted to maintain what was original—the library, living room, front hall, and stairs—with some improvements. I’d found photos of the living room showing that it had had a coffered ceiling, so Michael painstakingly recreated that look. The flooring in the front hall was replaced. The new marble floor is beautiful, and to my continuing delight, it is also heated... This house tells good story. Or it will tell good story. My girls will grow up here, become women here. Life will happen here. Laughter will happen here. Love will live here. Wrong and ugly judgments have given way to a deep and lasting bond. I love this house. As hard as the house was to renovate, I love it here. We have been on a journey. Weaving our way into the story of this house has been the trip of a lifetime. This formerly wrong and ugly house and I, we are family now. We are home.” Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @themichaelmundy; architecture by @hartmanbaldwin; text by @shondarhimes; styled by @lawrenhowell

Swiss designer Ubald Klug was known for taking on unconventional projects. There was his so-called bed for working, a prefab housing prototype, a study for the cockpit of a French airline. So, in the early 1970s, when Klug presented the furniture­maker @de_sede_switzerland with a fresh idea, it’s no surprise that he put forth something groundbreaking, pun intended—a sofa that resembled a pile of earth. “He had the idea to produce a kind of mountain,” explains Willi Glaeser, his onetime collaborator. “In the Alps the cows walk around leaving horizontal terraces. You see these patterns in this sofa.” Not every critic was smitten: @newyorkermag called it “a monstrous thing.” Dubbed Terrazza, Klug’s sofa is composed of seven graduated leather-wrapped cushions set on a rectangular base. “They’re like dominoes,” designer @kellywearstler says of the topography, which can be expanded ad infinitum. “You can have a 50- or 60-foot-long sofa if you want.” The design became synonymous with 1970s glam—Mick Jagger was famously snapped lounging atop a Terrazza, and a pair showed up in the sci-fi flick “Logan’s Run.” Though Klug isn’t exactly a household name, a persistent nostalgia for disco days has kept his most famous creation au courant. Designers such as Wearstler, @martynbullard, and @sallybreer snag Terrazzas secondhand (a single generally sells for less than $5,000 at auction) or pick up new models from de Sede (from $12,170). “I purchased it because I loved the way it looked,” says Swiss designer @yvesbehar, who lives with two in San Francisco, adding, “It’s the most comfortable thing in my home.” Learn more about the iconic design through the link in our profile. Photo of Terrazza sofas in a @claudemissir.interiors -designed Beirut house by @stephanjulliard

In the world of New York real estate, prewar apartments are like double-edged swords. On one hand, they have the kind of classical details and structure that make interior designers’ imaginations go wild; on the other, there are few instances when a gut renovation isn’t the only course of action. So it was for a 3,000-square-foot beauty on Madison Square Park that checked all the right boxes—location, size, and a dreamy view overlooking the treetops—but was lacking the aesthetic one stylish family desired. “The apartment was a mess: bad colors, bad finishes,” says celebrated interiors whisperer @ryankorban, who converted the three-bedroom space from what he calls “suburban” into a classic Manhattan aerie that blends downtown chic with uptown elegance for repeat clients with their own design credentials (the husband is the founder and owner of luxury bedding brand @kassatexnewyork). “Everything was brown; there were too many walls. It felt very heavy and closed in.” Using the floor-through apartment’s many windows as a framework, he opened up the space, knocking down partitions, installing discreet built-in storage, and establishing a family-friendly layout that separates public and private spaces; then transformed the residence with his signature brand of warm minimalism. Working closely with the client, Korban established a palette of cool grays, creamy whites, and moody blacks, grounding the design in sleek urbanity while using plush texture to soften the look. “It’s good to have a client who knows where things should be,” he says. “He has a very clear vision of design and quality.” In the living room, Korban installed custom built-in bookcases for seamless storage. Custom sofas designed by Korban for @ejvictorinc (available in early spring 2019) are covered in rough-textured silk by @jrobertscott and join custom bouclé-clad chairs for a warm look. The painting is by George Condo. Visit the link in our profile to take a tour of the home. Photo by @gievesanderson; text by @jenfernand

Like so many devoted cinephiles, Italian architect Renzo Piano (@rpbw_architects) began his love affair with the movies as a child. Born in Genoa not long before World War II, he remembers the films of his youth as a beguiling distraction and a beacon of optimism in the postwar years. “From where I stood, there were two avenues of escape, two frontiers to cross—the sea and the cinema,” recalls the 81-year-old Pritzker Prize winner. Today, as his dazzling design for the @academymuseum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles nears completion, Piano’s belief in the power and magic of cinema remains resolute. “Moviemaking is the most complete, truly contemporary art form,” he avers. “It brings narrative, acting, scenery, lighting, sound, and music together into the most marvelous machine for emotion.” Piano’s enthusiasm finds expression in a 300,000-square-foot design that, quite literally, ties the past to the future. The museum connects the renovated Saban Building—originally the May Company department store, a 1939 Streamline Moderne landmark designed by Albert C. Martin Sr.—with a new massive concrete sphere that suggests a modern riff on the geometric follies of 18th-century French architects Étienne-Louis Boullée and Claude-Nicolas Ledoux. “Making architecture is like making cinema. Both are about combining technology and practicality with things that belong to the imagination. And both require an army of people with ideas coming from all sides,” Piano observes. Visit the link in our profile to learn more about the upcoming building. Photo by @noahwebb; text by @mayer.rus

“I can’t tell you how much fun I had with the baths,” says @petermarinoarchitect of the contemporary home he crafted for a couple in Biscayne Bay, Miami. “I picked the marbles and onyx then matched the palette of the rooms to them.” In this particular bath, it’s Onyx Arco Iris, but other rooms in the home have a decidedly different look. Take the master suite, which is darker, and moody—“I had to convince the clients to go for a dark bedroom. In hot climates, if you paint a room dark it stays cooler. And it’s more glamorous,” says Marino. It wasn’t hard for these clients to trust the #AD100 architect, since he has had a close relationship with the couple for decades. He designed their Manhattan and Greenwich, CT, residences and went on to create a home for their daughter. For the couple’s Palm Beach estate, he had conjured a cluster of hip-roofed shadowy pavilions evocative of Polynesia that showcased their collections of contemporary art, Art Deco furniture, and museum-quality Southeast Asian sculptures. But Palm Beach had lost much of its appeal. One of their sons and his children lived tantalizingly close by in Miami, yet still too far away for them to see their grandchildren as often as they wished. Much of their great Asian art had been donated to museums. Plus, as one of the clients confided to the architect, “Miami is just so much hipper.” See how Marino designed their art-filled home through the link in our profile. Photo by @manoloyllera; text by @michaelboodro

For the new Biscayne Bay home of long-term clients, #AD100 architect @petermarinoarchitect designed two rectangular “boxes,” a long, narrow two-story one consisting of a library and master suite, with guest rooms upstairs, and a shorter, wider box set farther back, containing a double-height living and dining area. Linking them is a spacious extended entry that immediately reveals views of the water. “I always think it is important in a seaside house that you see the water the minute you enter,” declares the architect. The house demonstrates another of Marino’s strengths—his connection to art. He is a consummate collector (he recently established a foundation to display his works, which range from Renaissance bronzes to contemporary works) as well as a patron. He has commissioned artworks for so many of his projects that they have filled a book. Here he worked with the owners’ Asian sculptures and paintings by Léger, Miró, Kiefer, and Prince, but was also able to commission pieces including Lalanne furnishings, and a geometric light fixture by Johanna Grawunder in the dining area, as well as a series of his own large bronze boxes. In the living room, pictured here, an Alexander Calder mobile crowns the space while works by Alberto Burri, Lucio Fontana, Paolo Scheggi, and Agostino Bonalumi hang on the wall. A gold Wendell Castle triad chair and @garridogallery cocktail table furnish the space. Visit the link in our profile to see inside the home. Photo by @manoloyllera; text by @michaelboodro

Anyone can deploy a desiccated leaf as a table decoration. But @johnderian always seems to have the perfect dead leaf, heroic in scale, robust in form, with an exquisite craquelure to betray its delicacy. It’s also completely commonplace to leave a bunch of flowers to wilt on a mantel. But Derian, the beloved New York design maestro and duke of decoupage, appears to command his floral beauties to wither and die with sublime poignancy, like operatic divas trilling sweetly as they waste away from consumption or melancholia. The unsurprising truth, of course, is that no one does John Derian quite like John Derian. Consider the wonderland of tender beauty that unfolds in his own East Village home. Inside, Derian’s major architectural intervention was the installation of a perfectly patinated and ornamented 18th-century Swedish wall, painted in pale Gustavian blue, with two sets of double doors (pictured above). Completely bisecting the apartment, it now separates the open living and dining rooms on one side and the kitchen and bedroom on the other. “The wall was in storage for 15 years. I got it from a dealer in Antwerp, and I tried to use it in different stores and in my last apartment, but it never worked. Here, it mercifully fit by one inch,” Derian explains. Evenings chez Derian typically begin with the chef at the cooktop and his guests lounging comfortably in the seating area. From there, the party moves to the opposite side of the Swedish wall, where dinner is served on a 19th-century painted wood table beneath a vintage German glass Christmas ornament known as a kugel (not to be confused with the Jewish casserole of the same name). For dessert and post-prandial schmoozing, the scene shifts to the living room, where the Derian-designed sofas are covered in spruce white denim and laden with one-of-a-kind throws by @jeanette_farrier. To see more of the home, click the link in our profile. Photo by @stephenkentjohnson; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @michaelreynoldsnyc

When clients come to #AD100 architect @petermarinoarchitect, they usually know what to expect, but they can never quite tell exactly what they will get. Marino is a modernist who has demonstrated over and over again that the words simple and sumptuous are not antithetical. And when he agrees to design a private home, the results may be more subtle, but they are no less spectacular. Marino has had a close relationship with the couple who commissioned this house for decades. For the couple’s Palm Beach estate, he had conjured a cluster of hip-roofed shadowy pavilions evocative of Polynesia that showcased their collections of contemporary art, Art Deco furniture, and museum-quality Southeast Asian sculptures. But Palm Beach had lost much of its appeal. One of their sons and his children lived tantalizingly close by in Miami, yet still too far away for them to see their grandchildren as often as they wished. The ideal location would be on one of the small man-made islands that dot Biscayne Bay, secluded but not far from all the activity of South Beach—or their son. But Miami’s private islands are hotbeds of celebrity and wealth, and prime property was not easy to come by. The site the couple ultimately acquired on Star Island was a long rectangle, with access to the water at one narrow end. The architect had to contend with what he describes as “a shoebox plot—a very difficult site. Only a couple of rooms could have water views. My solution to the shoebox site was more shoeboxes.” His ingenious design features two rectangular “boxes,” a long, narrow two-story one consisting of a library and master suite, with guest rooms upstairs, and a shorter, wider box set farther back, containing a double-height living and dining area. Linking them is a spacious extended entry that immediately reveals views of the water. “I always think it is important in a seaside house that you see the water the minute you enter,” declares the architect. Visit the link in our profile to see inside the home. Photo by @manoloyllera; text by @michaelboodro

“I was really struck by the romance of the place,” actor Dominic West remembers of the first time he visited Glin Castle, the centuries-old, 20,000-square-foot fortress nestled on a sliver of Ireland's coast along the North Atlantic Ocean. It's no wonder—he was attending the 21st birthday party of the woman, Catherine Fitzgerald (@catofglin), who decades later would become not only his wife but also his co-owner of the Glin Castle estate. That the historic home played an integral part in the couple's eventual courtship was perhaps preordained. Glin Castle has been home to the Fitzgeralds, hereditary Knights of Glin, since the 14th century, and throughout its 800-year-history has played host to many an occasion for the long-standing Irish family. There were wars and weddings, feasts and famines, many births and many deaths, as well as both stretches of great prosperity that saw Glin Castle as a pillar of high society and periods when financial ruin saw it almost fall into decay. But, fast-forwarding through all of that to the present day, West and Fitzgerald now dedicate themselves to simply preserving the historic property—which they, along with Fitzgerald's two sisters, purchased last year—as a retreat for their family and friends. “As a museum curator, my father was arranging the furniture like a museum,” says Fitzgerald. “My contribution is to slightly relax it, to have some chairs where you can put up your feet around the fire so people can really feel at home and enjoy their stay.” Adds West: “Very little has changed. We’ve just replaced carpets and curtains, but the furniture is pretty much as my father-in-law left it. He was a collector of Irish furniture, and a lot of the furniture was made for the house so it's been here for decades or centuries.” Visit the link in our profile to take a tour of the home. Photo by @clairebingham_design; text by @katherineparkermagyar

When Jeanette Mix tapped #AD100 designer Ilse Crawford to help reconfigure the Mix family’s 1916 mansion, she had to trust her. “We really interrogate clients,” Crawford explains. “What would she do in her study? Are the kids going to come in here? How are they going to sit? When are they going to use it? What if someone needs to step out and make a phone call?” That analytical deep dive captivated Jeanette, a trained sommelier and skilled cook. “It was an intellectual journey where I learned so much about myself,” she recalls. Trusting Crawford meant agreeing to her radical suggestion to relocate the kitchen, from a distant corner of the main floor to the lovely but lonely drawing room. Today, with its tall double doors opened wide, the sunny latter space has become a fulcrum.“Everything is quite perforate on this floor,” says Kirsten James, who was the lead designer on the Mix commission. “You’ve got this really nice circulation, where you can access every room and have different activities but all be together.” The decor of things old, new, custom-made, and recycled (“Beauty has many faces,” Crawford sagely observes) includes a scrap-wood @piet_hein_eek cabinet that makes a rugged foil for the fancy-pants chandelier—which now incorporates mono-point lighting that illuminates the island for food preparation and washing up. Also in the kitchen, pictured above, is a sapele wood cabinet by Studio Ilse, and a sofa by Mogens Koch for Rud. Rasmussen in front of the island. To see more of the home, visit the link in our profile. Photo by @magnusmarding; text by @adaesthete; styled by @jcbhrtzl

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