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Architectural Digest  The International Design Authority.

Saturated bursts of full-bodied gem tones aren’t exactly standard operating procedure for @ashe_leandro, the #AD100 firm. But sometimes the best results come from having conventions challenged. Partners Ariel Ashe and Reinaldo Leandro started essentially from scratch to redo a 2,000-square-foot, three-bedroom apartment in the Sterling Mason building in NYC's Tribeca, taking major inspiration from Italian design firm @dimorestudio as they went. What they didn’t know at the time was that their client was getting feedback and ideas beyond the scenes from her design-savvy sister. “They are a young family, not afraid to be bold and playful in their choices. We said, ‘Why don’t we do a Dimore take, bring some of that Milanese style to Tribeca?’” says Leandro. Ashe adds, “It turned out really cool in the end because it’s a lot more colorful than we usually do.”The owners were game for anything and didn’t feel precious about any of their existing pieces, Ashe says, adding, “That’s always something I want to hear.” She knew they were more adventurous than she is personally, so the designer took the chance to dip a toe into a Technicolor pond. “I’ve been a fan of Dimore’s work and this just gave me an opportunity to kind of go crazy, which was fun. I showed them their work and they’re like, ‘Yeah, that’s great.’ So I was like, ‘Good, we’ll do the Ashe + Leandro version.’” They recovered a couple of existing pieces in the living room in sumptuous velvets, seen here, and had the bronze coffee table in front of the @dimitriyco couch made by a metal worker in New Mexico. See more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @franparente; text by @katromeyn

“Interiors should be a collage of your life,” interior designer @mariecarolinewillms explains. “My philosophy is to mix recycled, new, modern, antique, bespoke, collected, and homemade in a way that reflects one’s personality and creates a timeless interior.” This credo was put into action when Willms transformed her mother-in-law’s finca near Marbella, Spain into a full-time residence for herself, her husband and their two daughters. Willms was well suited to the job of bringing the neglected property back to life. She had grown up in historic homes, and since she—like her husband—is descended from European nobility you might call “land rich, cash poor,” she had art and antiques at her fingertips. “I didn’t have any budget; I just started rearranging furniture. I found stuff in the attic and in other houses we had,” she says. “For me, the layering of things is what makes a house a home.” A guest room is swathed in toile de jouy and a Chinese screen doubles as a headboard. Visit the link in our profile for a tour of the home. Photo by Manuel Zublena; text by @janekeltnerdev

From @getclever: "If you want to be surrounded by wonderful things, you have to seek out and buy wonderful things," a wise (if enabling) woman told @ryanclawson back in small-town Arkansas where he grew up. "Then in my case," he adds, "you have to get a storage unit." Now a well-established interior designer, Ryan left home for college in St. Louis before moving to Manhattan to start a decorating practice in the early aughts. Even then, he found a way to start collecting. First it was books, so that he could eventually have a library. "I managed to buy one great book a month when I first moved to New York City, and then two a month, and now I have thousands of books," says Ryan. The habit picked up steam. For his first city home, an Upper West Side apartment he shared with a roommate, Ryan decided to splurge on a pair of driftwood lamps "so big you couldn't hardly get them into the door of my bedroom," paying them off at the local antiques dealer over the course of six months. "I don't know why I chose to buy these lamps instead of going away on a trip to the beach." But it’s not just things Ryan has a knack for. In his current apartment in Greenwich Village, he got rid of the big refrigerator that blocked one of the double-height windows and replaced it with two under-the-counter fridges, and had his contractor make a butcher block topper for them. He then finished it with a cinched curtain made from an antique Japanese woodblock fabric. Take a closer look inside the home on @getclever through the link in our profile. Photo by @martyn_thompson; text by @mandasims

“I want to make people forget about the outside world a little,” decorator @beataheuman explains as she strolls into the entrance hall of her vest-pocket house in Hammersmith, a sparky, Thames-side neighborhood that’s gratifyingly ungentrified and, she points out, has great Tube connections. The high, narrow space offers a zesty contrast to the prim bay-windowed, golden-brick countenance of the Victorian where she and her husband, John Finlay, live with their toddler daughter, Gurli, and await the arrival of another babe any day now. “People are too serious about interior design: You can have fun, or you can follow all these rules that don’t matter much,” says Heuman, a rising star who hung out her decorating shingle just five years ago. Fellow Swedes, Heuman notes, might think that the couple’s cozy digs look overdecorated, but there’s definitely a Scandinavian vibe—lively, practical, bohemian in effect yet consciously, though not puritanically, restrained. In the powder room, Heuman created the vanity skirt of marbleized velvet and the shell sconces are from @felix_lighting. Take a tour of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @paulraeside; text by @adaesthete

Ask any gardener: If you’re looking for instant gratification, look elsewhere. Unless, that is, you’re a client of @harrisongreennyc—the New York landscape firm that specializes in lush city terraces, allées, and rooftops for the likes of @themarcjacobs, @therow, and even @themuseumofmodernart. “You can create an outdoor room in a day,” says Jacqueline Harrison, who founded the company with her husband, Damien, in 2013. As a design/build firm, Harrison Green prides itself on nurturing urban plots from inception to installation and then some, with regular maintenance as part of the package. For Manhattan’s Baccarat Hotel, the team installed great spheres of boxwood in Versailles planters and a three-story ivy treillage to evoke the formality of 18th-century France; for Jacobs, they marshaled ferns, hosta, ivy, viburnum, and a noble 15-foot hedge of European hornbeam to reimagine the garden of his Greenwich Village townhouse as an august oasis. For a rooftop in the Meatpacking District, seen here, they planted a garden of native species. Behind such feats loom logistics unique to city gardens, from calculating soil weights for rooftop beds to snagging crane permits to hoist a Sub-Zero-size boxwood into position. Jacqueline oversees installation and maintenance, while Damien runs the design studio. He counts classical Italian gardens—structured, functional, predominantly green—as influences, along with Australia’s urban garden culture. Learn more about the landscape-design team through the link in our bio. Photo by @nicholascalcott; text by @samedford

As the saying goes, it’s the journey, not the destination. But for Athena Calderone, the domestic goddess behind lifestyle site @EyeSwoon, and husband Victor (@vcalderone), music producer and techno DJ, their journey brought them to a superb destination: a 25-foot-wide Greek Revival townhouse in historic Cobble Hill, Brooklyn. Rewind to 1996 and The Limelight, New York’s legendary nightclub, housed in a Gothic-style deconsecrated church, where Victor first laid eyes on Athena, then a young bartender. A basement apartment in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, set the stage for the next phase of courtship, quarters so cozy they shared a twin Murphy bed. “That’s love,” Athena jokes. Eight residences later, they have finally finished their forever home which has more than enough room for two in the master suite which takes up an entire floor. Double doors lead from the bedroom to Athena’s walk-through closet to this bathroom lined with pink-veined white marble. “I legit asked Victor, ‘Are you man enough to shower in a pink bathroom?’ ” His response: “Hell, yeah.” Outside of the shower, @kampstudios crafted the hand-troweled, custom-fluted venetian plaster walls and ceiling. A ceramic work by @barrycanter and candelabra, both from @rwguild top the mantel while a sculpture by @studioolivergustav and stool by Maurice Jallot fill the corner. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @gievesanderson; design by @eyeswoon; architectural design in collaboration with @elizabeth_roberts_architecture; text by @janekeltnerdev; styled by @colinking

In an idyllic corner of Pennsylvania, #AD100 interior designer @isabellopezquesada and architect Pietro Cicognani transformed an 1860s barn into a charming home for the young family of Mati Bonetti de Buccini (@mati.atelier). This is López-Quesada’s first stateside project (she is based in Madrid), and she accepted it on the spot. “Chadds Ford is one of the most beautiful landscapes on the East Coast. It was a dream, an absolute dream, to have this opportunity,” she says. Though based on different continents, Buccini and López-Quesada stayed in touch via WhatsApp and carefully selected each unique piece. A sunroom pairs distressed glass tiles from a Bordeaux studio with antique tiles reclaimed from Buccini’s great-grandmother’s home in Santiago de los Caballeros in the Dominican Republic. An 18th-century French tapestry commands a wall of the dining area at one end of the kitchen, where antique glass-fronted cabinets frame a long farm table that can seat 12. In keeping with the desire to honor the locale, much of the wood—on walls, floors, and ceilings—was salvaged from old barns, and much of the work was executed by Amish craftsmen in the area. That’s not to say there isn’t a strong showing of contemporary furnishings. In the dining area, vintage Poul Henningsen pendants hang over brass-and-glass dining tables by López-Quesada and the chairs wear a @schumacher1889 fabric. Tour the rest of the home via the link in our bio. Photo by @sturman70; text by @lea_carpenter; styled by @michaelbargo

When Austrian-German interior designer @mariecarolinewillms decided to move into her in-law’s finca near Marbella, Spain, the first step was to clear a path through the thorny bushes so overgrown “even the dogs wouldn’t venture into them,” Willms says. Today the restored estate is home to the couple, their two daughters (Flavia, 6, and Milana, 2), and a supporting cast of animals, from four donkeys to those nine wary dogs. To the couple’s happy surprise, they unearthed centuries-old olive groves, which now produce an organic extra-virgin oil from varieties of trees so unique to the region that they have yet to be named. When it came to decorating the interior, “I didn’t have any budget; I just started rearranging furniture. I found stuff in the attic and in other houses we had,” Willms says. “For me, the layering of things is what makes a house a home,” she adds. Willms is currently designing two boutique hotels in the southern seaside town of Tarifa, Spain. One will resemble the private home of an old Spanish marquis—aristocratic and elegant but in the relaxed style of a country house. The other has a more Bahamian feel, with palm trees and a blue-and-white palette. Considering Willms’s assertion that her “least favorite thing is everything perfectly matching—it looks like a hotel,” neither of these properties will remotely resemble the dreaded H word. Learn more about the rising designer through the link in our profile. Photo by @esiphotography.es; text by @janekeltnerdev

“People are too serious about interior design: You can have fun, or you can follow all these rules that don’t matter much,” says @beataheuman, a rising star who hung out her decorating shingle just five years ago. For her own family home in London’s Hammersmith neighborhood, Heuman splashed the spaces with her cheerful, cheeky style. Fellow Swedes, Heuman notes, might think that the couple’s cozy digs look overdecorated, but there’s definitely a Scandinavian vibe—lively, practical, bohemian in effect yet consciously, though not puritanically, restrained. Working with @tiborreich, a long-lamented but recently revived British wallpaper firm, Heuman commissioned a delicious background for the dining room, seen here: a squiggly pattern of perky flowers and twining leaves that’s a mash-up of vintage doodles by the firm’s founder. “It’s like somebody drew on my walls,” she says. The chairs around the Art Deco–style table add a racy frisson to the sweet setting, the bentwood frames slicked with zippered black-leather covers that were Heuman’s idea: “The zips make them a bit sexy.” See more of the home via the link in our profile. Photo by @paulraeside; text by @adaesthete

Though unmistakably contemporary, #AD100 architect and designer @vincentvanduysen’s oeuvre feels eternal. As in a Vermeer painting, one expects to hear nothing more than the ticking of a clock or, perhaps, one’s own heartbeat. Nothing appears new. Everything, one of his client says, “has patiné.” But in this sun-swept triplex in Lower Manhattan by Van Duysen, that ticking is drowned out by the shouts of two young boys. “My clients have hectic lives now, always in a rush, so the spaces had to be very calming,” Van Duysen says of this Stateside project, a soup-to-nuts renovation that included designing much of the furniture. Towering doorways and windows are lined up throughout, establishing sweeping vistas and reassuring rhythms. When it comes to color, harshness is avoided and harmony embraced. Voluptuous Belgian linen curtains, the color of clotted cream, fade into same-color walls. Chunky handwoven carpets and cushions are executed in browns that recall earth, here pale and parched, there dark and rain-soaked. Oak beams have been sawn into manageable lengths and stacked to make a massive cocktail table. “My colors tend to be desaturated and mostly derived from nature,” says Van Duysen, adding, “I like to create a symphony of elements.” The kitchens pendant light, oak cabinets, table, chairs and island were designed by Van Duysen. See the rest of the home via the link in our profile. Photo by @francoishalard; text by @adaesthete; styled by Anita Sarsidi

When @mariecarolinewillms and Alejandro Gamazo Hohenlohe moved to his mother’s finca near Marbella, Spain, six years ago, it was encircled in thorny bushes so overgrown “even the dogs wouldn’t venture into them,” Willms says. Today the restored estate is home to the couple, their two daughters, and a supporting cast of animals, from four donkeys to those nine wary dogs. Willms, an Austrian-German interior designer who relocated to Spain after she met Gamazo Hohenlohe, was well suited to the job of bringing the property back to life. She had grown up in historic homes, and since she—like her husband—is descended from European nobility you might call “land rich, cash poor,” she had art and antiques at her fingertips. “I didn’t have any budget; I just started rearranging furniture. I found stuff in the attic and in other houses we had,” she says, explaining that two mismatched sofas in the living room have been draped with old curtains. (If Scarlett O’Hara could fashion them into a gown, why not a sofa?) Unable to find a coffee table she liked in the family archives, Willms made a pair with faux tiger rugs, which she had sewn onto a base of woven grass that’s local to the region. “The only money I spent was on paint,” Willms observes, such as the peppy peacock-blue that coats the living room walls. Visit the link in our bio to see more of the home. Photo by Manuel Zublena; text by @janekeltnerdev

“I’d describe her style as Brazilian boho meets California rock ’n’ roll,” #AD100 designer @martynbullard observes of his client, supermodel @alessandraambrosio’s taste. “We wanted to do something that feels young and fresh, not just for the children but for Alessandra as well. She has an incredibly vivacious spirit.” The mood of her 1920s home in Santa Monica is established in the entryway, seen here, where a stairway clad in brilliant blue tile is joined by a 19th-century Chinese apothecary cabinet, turquoise ceramic lamps with Indian sari-fabric shades, a vintage Persian carpet, and an Egyptian Revival chandelier. Reminders of Ambrosio’s Brazilian heritage are peppered throughout the residence, from the jacaranda tree planted in the front yard to the Jorge Zalszupin armchairs in the living room and the Jean Gillon lounge chair in the model’s bedroom. Sympathetic furnishings of Moroccan, Indian, Turkish, and Italian descent round out the global-chic assemblage. “Martyn brought a lot of color, texture, and life to the project,” says Ambrosio. “I love exotic places, and he knows how to conjure a fantasy that still feels playful and appropriate for kids. I didn’t want anything too stiff or serious.” See more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @thefacinator; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @amykchin

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