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Rohingya have fled en masse to escape persecution before. Hundreds of thousands left Myanmar in 1978 and again in the early 1990s, though policies subsequently allowed many to return. Communal violence in 2012, as the country was transitioning from a half-century of dictatorship to democracy, sent another 100,000 fleeing by boat.
For the next few days, we will share photos and stories of the Rohingya exodus from AP South Asia News Director and AP photojournalist Bernat Armangué (@bernatarmangue) and AP photographer Dar Yasin (@daryasinap). Caption: In this Nov. 5, 2017, photo, newly arrived Rohingya Muslims carry yellow plastic container they used as flotation aids and listen to Bangladeshi authorities, not pictured, after swimming across the Naf river at Shah Porir Dwip, Bangladesh. #APPhoto @bernatarmangue

#Rohingya #Myanmar #Bangladesh #Nafriver #BernatArmangue #DarYasin #AssociatedPress

The exodus of Rohingya Muslims started Aug. 25 when insurgents attacked dozens of police posts in Myanmar. The retribution from Myanmar’s authorities was swift and brutal. Hundreds of Rohingya villages in Rakhine state have been set on fire. Fleeing Rohingya have told stories of arson and rape and shootings by Myanmar soldiers and Buddhist mobs. The violence, which the U.N. describes as ethnic cleansing, has pushed more than 600,000 Rohingya into Bangladesh.
For the next few days, we will share photos and stories of the Rohingya exodus from AP South Asia News Director and AP photojournalist Bernat Armangué (@bernatarmangue) and AP photographer Dar Yasin (@daryasinap). Caption: A Rohingya Muslim man Abdul Kareem walks towards a refugee camp carrying his mother Alima Khatoon after crossing over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, at Teknaf, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017. #APPhoto @daryasinap

#Rohingya #mother #son #AbdulKareem #AlimaKhatoon #Myanmar #Bangladesh #Teknaf #Rakhine #BernatArmangue #DarYasin #AssociatedPress

An East German border guard peers through a crack in the Berlin Wall, Nov. 17, 1989, shortly after a West Berliner painted a keyhole around the opening. #APPhoto John Gaps III
#TodayInHistory #BerlinWall #1989 # border #guard #AssociatedPress #OTD #photojournalism

This is how we cover the news. Our Associated Press team @v_salemi @mohammadaptn @saeedsarmadi introduce the new Associated Press Instagram account @reportersreporting from Sarpol-e-Zahab, Iran.

They are covering recovery efforts on the border between Iran and Iraq, an area devastated by the 7.2 earthquake which struck on Sunday.
Our new account features AP journalists in the field, shooting photos and video and reporting news stories across the globe. From Bangladesh to Venezuela, @reportersreporting provides a behind-the-scenes look at AP’s newsgathering efforts across all formats, offering a window into the work that produces the news report.

#APOnAssignment #journalism #videojournalism #photojournalism #photographer #videographer #associatedpress #Iran #Iraq #earthquake #MohammadNasiri #VahidSalemi #SaeedSarmadi

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Treasurer Jovita Carranza are now on the money, literally.

The two officials took a tour of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing on Wednesday to see firsthand the production of new $1 bills, the first currency that will bear their signatures.

Caption: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, right, and his wife Louise Linton, hold up a sheet of new $1 bills, the first currency notes bearing his and U.S. Treasurer Jovita Carranza's signatures, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) in Washington. The Mnuchin-Carranza notes, which are a new series of 2017, 50-subject $1 notes, will be sent to the Federal Reserve to issue into circulation. At left is BEP Director Leonard Olijar. #APPhoto @jacquelynmartin

#StevenMnuchin #LouiseLinton #money #dollarbill #TreasurySecretary #AssociatedPress #JacquelynMartin

"There’s always an internal struggle. As a photographer, I want to capture the moment because my job is to tell the story. As a human, the agony can be too hard to watch." AP photographer Jae Hong @jaechongpix shares his experience documenting homelessness.
To see the full video, visit apimagesblog.com, link at profile.

#homeless #crisis #WestCoast #JaeCHong #TheAssociatedPress #portrait #photojournalism #California #Hollywood #LosAngeles #video

As part of a project looking at the homeless crisis on the West Coast, AP photographer Jae C. Hong (@jaechongpix) traveled to Seattle, San Francisco and to Los Angeles to shoot intimate portraits of the people with no permanent homes. He used a special lens to focus on their eyes. For the next few days, we are sharing some of the stories those people told:

James Harris
Age: 54

Home: A tent in Hollywood, California

James Harris likes to open with “God bless you” before asking for money. It makes him feel better to offer something in exchange for a handout. “It’s hard panhandling and taking things from people,” he said.

Harris said he has had AIDS for 30 years, he said. When medication stopped working, he got depressed and was evicted. Now he feels like an outcast, vulnerable and struggling to survive. “I’ve been beaten, robbed, chased,” he said. “People steal your tents and your tarps and your clothes. I’ve lost everything I owned.” He’s hoping that as a veteran he can get permanent housing, though he missed an earlier opportunity because a stint in a shelter disqualified him from being considered chronically homeless.

He gets by on $900 a month from Social Security and whatever he can scrounge up. A little extra cash might get him some crack to smoke at night. “I put needs first, drugs last,” he said.

He spent the remaining $105 from a recent check on a suit and put on makeup to look like Two-Face, the villain from Batman comics. He wanted to “make an honest living” with others dressed as superheroes or movie characters jostling for tips on Hollywood Boulevard.

But it didn’t go well. He said he didn’t earn a dime.

Story by Jae C. Hong and @brianmelley
For more, visit APImagesblog.com

#homeless #crisis #WestCoast #JamesHarris #JaeCHong #TheAssociatedPress #portrait #photojournalism #California #Hollywood #LosAngeles

As part of a project looking at the homeless crisis on the West Coast, AP photographer Jae C. Hong (@jaechongpix) traveled to Seattle, San Francisco and to Los Angeles to shoot intimate portraits of the people with no permanent homes. He used a special lens to focus on their eyes. For the next few days, we are sharing some of the stories those people told:

John Ruiz

Age: 9
Home: An RV with his parents and siblings in Mountain View, California, the home of Google

The fourth-grader dreams of going to college. He knows it’s the path to a better job and a home that’s not on four wheels.
His father is a minimum-wage landscaper who moved the family to an aging camper after they were evicted from an apartment where the rent kept going up, nearing $3,000 a month. His mother is five months pregnant.
The family parks the recreational vehicle outside an apartment building where three bedroom apartments rent for up to $6,000 a month.

John Ruiz’s friends at school were surprised to hear he lived in an RV. “I thought they were going to laugh, but they were OK with it,” he said.

The worst thing about living in a camper is that it’s cramped, hot in summer and cold in winter. He and his brother have to walk to get water and dump their trash.
“At least we have a home we can live in,” he said. “I have a bunch of toys. Mostly the good part is there’s a little stove where we can eat.” John dreams of his family having a successful life together and maybe ending up in a mansion _ a home that might have a swimming pool and backyard. Or at least one big enough to have his own room.
“I want to have a happy life,” he said.

Story by Jae C. Hong and @brianmelley
For more, visit APImagesblog.com

#homeless #crisis #WestCoast #JohnRuiz #JaeCHong #TheAssociatedPress #portrait #photojournalism #California #MountainView

As part of a project looking at the homeless crisis on the West Coast, AP photographer Jae C. Hong (@jaechongpix) traveled to Seattle, San Francisco and to Los Angeles to shoot intimate portraits of the people with no permanent homes. He used a special lens to focus on their eyes. For the next few days, we are sharing some of the stories those people told:

Alicia Adara

Age: 33

Home: A tent in Seattle

Alicia Adara says she ended up on the street after losing a custody fight for her two children to her ex-husband.

She panhandles to survive and also gets $198 a month in food stamps. She showers at Mary’s Place, a nonprofit daycare center for homeless. Sometimes she takes sponge baths at the Seattle Ferry Terminal.

The tent she sleeps in is not the home she wants, but right now it’s the one she chooses _ and it beats living in a shelter. “I don’t do shelters. I feel like I’m in jail,” she said. “I‘ve been like basically a prisoner all my life. I need to do this. I need to be out here. It’s freedom.” As she sat in an alley in downtown killing time, she said she thinks she’ll do this for another year and then hopes for a permanent job. She doesn’t have a clue what that will be.

She takes a long pause to consider it and then says, “dog sitter.” Story by Jae C. Hong and @brianmelley
#homeless #crisis #WestCoast #AliciaAdara #JaeCHong #TheAssociatedPress #portrait #photojournalism #Seattle

As part of a project looking at the homeless crisis on the West Coast, AP photographer Jae C. Hong (@jaechongpix) traveled to Seattle, San Francisco and to Los Angeles to shoot intimate portraits of the people with no permanent homes. He used a special lens to focus on their eyes. For the next few days, we are sharing some of the stories those people told:

Harrison Perkins
Age: 31
Home: A Seattle street

The path to the streets began with a prescription for the powerful painkiller OxyContin, Harrison Perkins said.
He has a rare heart disease and pain in his legs. He began supplementing his medication with heroin, though that cost him dearly.
“That’s why my belongings are gone,” he said. “I don’t have a watch on my hand. I don’t have a wedding band. I got rid of whatever jewelry I had.” He never finished college studies in computer science, but managed to do computer work for years.
He and his wife lost a place to live when she accidentally set fire to her mother’s kitchen and the landlord wouldn’t let them return.
Perkins said he’s been clean for six months, but it’s hard to remain sober on the street. He’s thinking of moving back to his native Cleveland and hoping to stay with his brother there. Perkins concedes that his drug problems have given his brother reservations, so he’s not sure that will happen.

He and his wife can’t afford a place to live in Seattle on the $760 disability check he gets each month from Social Security, and he’s resorted to begging.
The couple can’t stay together at a shelter and don’t want to be exposed to bed bugs and lice outbreaks there, so they opted to live on the street, where their possessions have been stolen.
“Drugs are offered to me more than a place to live,” he said. “Even in my worst drug addiction days, I always kept a roof over my head. ... We literally have nothing. This is what we’ve got. It’s not worth it.” For more, visit APImagesBlog.com, link at profile.

Story by Jae C. Hong and @brianmelley
#homeless #crisis #WestCoast #HarrisonPerkins #JaeCHong #TheAssociatedPress #portrait #photojournalism #Seattle

As part of a project looking at the homeless crisis on the West Coast, AP photographer Jae C. Hong (@jaechongpix) traveled to Seattle, San Francisco and to Los Angeles to shoot intimate portraits of the people with no permanent homes. He used a special lens to focus on their eyes. For the next few days, we are sharing some of the stories those people told:

Tammy Stephen

Age: 54
Home: A Seattle homeless encampment

They call her “mom.” Tammy Stephen, whose children have grown up, cooks and looks after the denizens of Camp Second Chance as if they were her own.
“I’m not going to let my family go hungry,” she said. “We’re doing our best to get through life. I don’t let people mess with my family.”
She has known the cycle of dependence herself and been pulled down in it by partners, she said.
Six times she’s lost a place to live because her third husband got high and got them evicted.
The final time came when things started looking up. Her husband had just landed a job, but spent his first paycheck on meth and got them booted again. She went her own way at that point.
“I broke the cardinal rule. I met him at rehab,” she said. “One of the first things he said was, ‘Don’t fall in love with me. I’m not good.’ I should have listened.”
She didn’t get sober until her third try in rehab
She’s been homeless more than three years and has been talking with other campers about pooling money to rent a place, but it can cost $1,200 to $1,500 for tiny apartments.
At one point, she and a daughter were living in someone’s storage room for $700 a month. It was hard to afford on her monthly $734 disability payment.
“Most homeless people I know aren’t homeless because they’re addicts,” she said. “Maybe they were at one time. Most people are homeless because they can’t afford a place to live.” Story by Jae C. Hong and @brianmelley
#homeless #crisis #WestCoast #TammyStephen #JaeCHong #TheAssociatedPress #portrait #photojournalism #seattle

The homeless are easy to pass by on the street. It’s harder when you look into their eyes. Behind each person is a story that however vague offers some glimpse into their lives.
As part of a project looking at the homeless crisis on the West Coast, AP photographer Jae C. Hong (@jaechongpix) traveled to Seattle, San Francisco and to Los Angeles to shoot intimate portraits of the people with no permanent homes. He used a special lens to focus on their eyes. For the next few days, we are sharing the stories behind some of those eyes:

Moi Williams
Age: 59
Home: Streets of Los Angeles
Across from the elegant Millennium Biltmore hotel, Moi Williams reclined on his side, resting on an elbow on concrete steps leading to a park in the heart of downtown Los Angeles.

Rather than stand out in contrast to the business people hustling by or commuters heading home, he fits in as one of the many homeless people who idle their days in Pershing Square.

Williams’ stare is as empty as the details he offers about his life.

He said he’s been on the streets three or four years. His beard and hair are starting to gray and a cigarette is propped behind his left ear.

He had a job, but “it just got away,” he said. He figured he’d find another, but it never came along. “I’m not fighting, like I used to,” he said. “When I was younger, before I got a job, I used to fight a lot.” Now he is trying to beat drugs and alcohol.

Williams would like a place to live and some money, but said he doesn’t stay at shelters and hasn’t signed up for any public assistance. For now, he’s mostly comfortable where he is. “I’m not bothering nobody,” Williams said. “I’m not being bothered.” #APPhoto @jaechongpix
For more, visit APImagesBlog.com, link at profile
Story by Jae C. Hong and @brianmelley
#homeless #crisis #WestCoast #MoiWilliams #JaeCHong #TheAssociatedPress #portrait #photojournalism #LosAngeles

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