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Alberta Cancer Foundation  Together, we can create more moments for Albertans facing cancer. Use the tag #ACFmoremoments to share your moments. #albertacancer

https://albertacancer.ca/

Oooh!! We can't wait to start sharing stories with you from the latest issue of Leap magazine featuring our incredible cover girls Adolescent and Young Adult Patient Navigator Jodie Jespersen and cancer warrior @rickiehild! 🙌🏽🙌🏾
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Keep your eyes peeled for this issue, out now! 👀

Did you know, 200-300 new cases of #cancer are diagnosed every year in adolescents and young adults in #Alberta?

We had a ball treating our wonderful friends at the Cross Cancer Institute to some franks and games today. Thank you all so much for standing by Albertans facing cancer every day. Your kindness, compassion and excellent care mean everything and we are so grateful to share this journey with such incredible partners. 🙏🏽
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Also, a big round of applause for @carriecreaser @_xiaowiebe @natpearso and Sarah Dittrich for helping set up and rep the ACF booth of fun! You ladies are the best! 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼

CancerControl Alberta: Special Education Event
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Living Your Best Life With and Beyond Cancer
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Tips, tools and inspiration to help you make the rest of your life the best of your life. Topics include hope, physical wellness and others. There will also be a fair with a range of community resources.
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Event Details:
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Who: For All Cancer patients, their family and friends
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When: Friday, September 22, 2017
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Where and What Time:
Calgary - Foothills Medical Centre Auditorium – 2:00 to 5:30 pm
Edmonton - Cross Cancer Institute Auditorium – 2:00 to 5:30 pm
Medicine Hat - Medicine Hat Regional – 12:00 to 4:00 pm
Hospital - Level 3 Lecture Theatre (Rooms A,B,C) – 12:00 to 4:00 pm
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To Register or for more information:
Calgary - Toll free at 1-855-258-9963
Edmonton - Toll free at 1-855-258-9963
Medicine Hat - 403-388-6866
Lethbridge - 403-502-8648 ext.1787
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If you would like to share this event with someone you know is facing cancer, you are welcome to do so, however, please avoid tagging patients in posts. Be respectful of patient privacy and send this post through a direct message instead. Thank you.

Sleep and your teen
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More than just energy levels and mood, lack of sleep can negatively impact your teen's mental well-being, memory, physical development, academic performance, decision-making, weight as well as increase his or her risk for for several chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
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This is why it is so concerning that Canadian children are not getting the amount of sleep they need.
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According to sleep experts, teenagers need a minimum of 9 to 10 hours of sleep a night – even more than they needed in junior high school. However, many teens sleep far less than their body requires.
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Instead of catching Z's, teens are busy keeping up with a packed schedule of extra-cirricular activities, homework and socializing with friends on social media.
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Dr. Jennifer Vriend, a child and adolescent psychologist, suggests the following to help teens get back on track with their sleep.
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1) Stick to a nightly routine.
2) Avoid eating too much 4 hours before bedtime.
3) Avoid caffeine 6 hours before bedtime.
4) Block out all distracting noise and eliminate as much light as possible.
5) Reserve the bed for sleep. Don’t use the bedroom as an office, workroom or recreation room.

These words were delivered by Rickie-Lee Hildebrand, 22, a former cancer patient, when she spoke about the impact of cancer on a young person's life at the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton this past spring.
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Regardless of whether you are a parent or not, no one wants to think about a child facing cancer. However distressing it is, however frightening, we must be aware of how cancer can affect our children, both now and in the future.
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Although it is rare, cancer is the second most common cause of mortality in children, after injury-related deaths, in Canada.
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And while overall survival for children with cancer has improved substantially over the last three decades, significant challenges remain.
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A considerable number of childhood cancers are incurable, particularly those where tumours have recurred or metastasized. The most important challenge at this time is to understand why specific types of tumours spread or come back and why some of the most aggressive tumours are so resistant to therapy.

Childhood obesity: Helping our children reduce their risk of cancer
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According to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, parental obesity was found to be the most potent risk factor in overweight children.
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Alberta Health Services estimates that we could prevent about 673 cases of cancer in Alberta each year if we help one another maintain a healthy weight.
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This support should also be extended to our kids as unhealthy eating habits in childhood often lead to excess weight in adulthood which in turn increases the risk of developing cancer.
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Reducing a person's risk of cancer starts early
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1) Model good eating habits for your children
Children learn through observation. Let your children see you enjoying plenty of fruits and vegetables, practicing portion control and making healthy food choices.
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2) Enjoy getting active as a family
Institute a 'family power hour'. Turn off the TV, turn up some music and get moving. Mimic animal movements or challenge your kids to a dance off. Make exercise fun and teach your kids the joy of movement.
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3) Indulge mindfully
Craving something sweet? Practice portion control and really focus on how delicious your favourite treat tastes. You're more likely to feel satisfied after a small but focused indulgence and your kids will learn the art of portion control.

Should my child receive the HPV vaccine?
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If your child will be entering grade five or grade nine in Alberta this year, you will likely have to make a decision about whether your child will receive an HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination through their school.
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How does the HPV vaccine work?
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Alberta Health Services: "The HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine protects against HPV. There are many types of HPV. Some types of the virus can cause genital warts. Other types can cause cervical or oral cancer and some uncommon cancers, such as vaginal and anal cancer. The HPV vaccine protects against the most common HPV types that can cause serious problems."
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As a parent, it is important to educate yourself about human papillomavirus, the HPV vaccine and what steps are involved when you choose to immunize your child or not.
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Find facts about HPV and other helpful resources simply by typing 'HPV' into the search bar at https://myhealth.alberta.ca/

How to talk to your children about your cancer diagnosis
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When you or your partner is facing cancer, it can be hard to find the words to discuss your diagnosis with your kids. If you are preparing for this difficult conversation, consider the following suggestions from CancerControl Alberta:
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1) Prepare what you will say by writing down your thoughts in advance. Discuss your ideas with your partner and ask them to be present when you talk to your children.
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2) If you have more than one child, consider whether your children might benefit from having conversations with you separately.
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3) Be honest with your children and let them know you have 'cancer' instead of saying 'I'm sick' so that they know that being sick doesn't necessarily mean someone has cancer.
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4) Tell your children that cancer is not something that can be caught from others and that your diagnosis did not occur because of something they did or said. Children sometimes blame themselves so it is important to be clear with them that your diagnosis is not their fault.
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5) Answer their questions honestly and ask your social worker for resources that you can pass on to your children to read, if they are older, or that you can read together. Let your children know that you are in good hands with your medical team.
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We hope these suggestions will help you navigate a conversation about cancer with your children and help you cope better as a family during this difficult moment.

[Pt. 3 of 3] Through her oncologist she learned about an immunotherapy clinical trial recruiting new patients and volunteered for it on the spot.
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“If I couldn’t help myself, I wanted to help someone else,” says Anneliese.
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As Anneliese relates the realities of her treatment from her home in Calgary (where she moved to be nearer family and the Tom Baker Cancer Centre), she does so calmly and matter-of-factly, her voice free of self-pity.
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When asked about her outlook on life at the moment, Anneliese doesn’t hesitate to describe all the precious moments she’s been able to share with her family.
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“I’ve had a good life! It’s quite a different story once you’ve had your turn. It might be hard for you to understand but that’s just how it is. Eventually we all come to an end. You just have to remember to enjoy your life because it won’t last forever. Enjoy it every day.”
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“I am so fortunate you have no idea. You probably think that I’m saying that to convince myself but I’ve just had two visitors come in from Switzerland and they stayed with us for 12 days, I’ve had all my children and grandchildren here on and off. No matter how busy they are we’ve all taken day trips and gone to the mountains, we’ve been fishing — we’ve done something fun for young and old. We’ve eaten well, we’ve laughed, we’ve cried. Life has been nothing but good. We would have done none of those things if I wasn’t aware of what was going on. We probably would have done some of them, but not as intensely. I’m very lucky.”
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Although she considers herself a realist at heart, Anneliese’s voice is full of hope and positivity when she talks about her involvement with the immunotherapy clinical trial.
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“This clinical trial will have a positive outcome for me no matter what because if I didn’t participate, there would be one less result, and while that may not seem like much, it’s a drop in the bucket. One drop in the bucket makes a pailful. It would be fantastic if [I survived] but I’m not a dreamer, I’m realistic. It’s nice to dream sometimes, though.” 🌥

[Pt. 2 of 3] Through her strong belief in the importance of medical research and her desire to be of service, Anneliese began participating in Alberta-based research studies and clinical trials.
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After being part of a brain study investigating Alzheimer’s and dementia, Anneliese learned about Alberta’s lung cancer screening study, led by Dr. Alain Tremblay, researcher and associate professor of respiratory medicine at the University of Calgary, and decided to sign up.
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Anneliese remembers doing the preliminary CT scan and then going on vacation to Cuba. When she returned, there was a message waiting for her on her answering machine.
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She heard the lung study mentioned and thought, Oh that’s weird, they aren’t supposed to phone again until next December.
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“[But] it wasn’t weird.” says Anneliese, “They had a reason for calling.”
Apparently, Anneliese’s CT scan had revealed a spot on her lungs the size of a pinky. Very soon after she met with her doctor who was optimistic that surgery was an option. After further testing, however, it became clear that Anneliese’s cancer was inoperable, something she says was “the only truly disappointing thing in my life.”
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Despite this devastating news and the uncertainty of her prognosis, Anneliese remains firm in her belief that clinical trials are humanity’s best shot at a brighter future. [Con't]

[Pt. 1 of 3] “One drop makes a pailful”: Why Anneliese Stauffer, 74, is committed to participating in Alberta’s clinical trials
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This isn’t possible. How can this be?
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“Those were my first thoughts when I was diagnosed with cancer. I’m sure everyone feels that way at first,” says Anneliese Stauffer, 74, in a bright, European accent.
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A wife, mother and grandmother of five, Anneliese was born in German-occupied Poland shortly after the outbreak of World War II. After fleeing to West Germany with her mother and brother, where they lived for several years, the Jantzen family immigrated to Canada when Anneliese was-15-years old and eventually settled in Calgary. In 1959 she met Hans, who became her husband. Together, they moved into a comfortable mountain home on the outskirts of Cadomin, a small mining town southwest of Jasper.
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Here, in ‘The Valley of the Winds’, Anneliese and Hans raised two sons and a daughter. In time, they welcomed three beautiful granddaughters (all of whom currently attend the University of Alberta) and two twin boys who she says ‘couldn’t be more different’. [Con't]

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