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National Geographic Asia  Official Nat Geo Asia 🧗‍♀️ Inspiring everyday explorers 🐼 #OneStrangeAsia for a feature 🌏 #PlanetOrPlastic? Choose the Planet. Take the Pledge ⬇️

These are some of the things Hong Kong’s craftspeople create with their own hands: milk tea, kwan kwa (traditional wedding dresses), and fa pao (religious offerings made of bamboo and paper). Hong Kong’s traditional crafts are an essential part of the city’s culture, and it’s been such a joy to see how these masters work up close. @laurelchor

Single-use plastic waste is a menacing global problem. The ocean is clogged with a staggering 9 million tons of plastic every year and rivers play a significant role, often acting as conveyor belts for plastic debris in the ocean.
Meet the ALL-FEMALE TEAM of international scientists who has embarked on expeditions this year to study plastic pollution from sea to source in one of the world’s most iconic waterways-the Ganges river, and help identify solutions to the plastic waste crisis.
Follow their journey at #ExpeditionPlastic or NatGeo.org/Plastic
#Repost @insidenatgeo @lillysedaghat @jenna.jambeck_ @heatherk_zsl
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Drive the change. Take the pledge.
#IChoosePlanet #PlanetorPlastic
🌏 Pledge Link in Bio

#OneStrangeAsia with @thehunzailad | Aerial view of Attabad Lake, a natural wonder that formed as a result of the 2010 landslide tragedy at Attabad Village in Hunza Valley, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan 🇵🇰

Partner content @gamudaland // “A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.” – Greek proverb. Future generations deserve to enjoy nature just as we do now. The idea behind the Gamuda Parks initiative is not to change, but enhance what nature already provides. // Photo by Gamuda Land #GamudaParks

#fieldnotesasia with Nat Geo Explorer @wildxings | I am Shuang Xing, and I study tropical biodiversity and conservation. I mostly work with insects and I am fascinated by their diverse forms and amazing living strategies. The diversity of tropcial insects is extremely high, yet they're mostly understudied, and are currently facing multiple threats including climate change, habitat loss and insect trade. With the combination of field sampling, experiments and modeling, I aim to understand the vulnerability of insects to global change impacts and how to protect them accordingly. I' ve been lucky to explore many beautiful forests in subtropical and tropical Asia to look for insects. During my exploration in a rainforest in Yunnan, China supported by @natgeo, a curious damselfly landed on my handnet. We had a very enjoyable moment staring at each other (at least I had). Through its eyes, I felt reconnected to the grand nature and the exquisite universe #sciencetelling

#fieldnotesasia with Nat Geo Explorer @rusomaweera | KOPI LUWAK. Tied up inside a tiny cage, this Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) will spend the rest of its life eating #coffee cherries and pooping out seeds because somewhere down the track, someone thought that this process makes the coffee taste better.

#KopiLuwak is among the most expensive #coffees in the world now. On the other hand hundreds and thousands of civets are been force-fed with coffee in battery cage systems across SE Asia to supply this lucrative market.

Next time you are on holiday in #Bali, think twice before you support this #inhumane industry.

#luwak #luwakcoffee #indonesia

Have you been keeping up with #HostilePlanet with @beargrylls?

Flood, famine, freeze and fire - grasslands can be some of the most volatile landscapes on the planet.

Tune into a new episode of Hostile Planet every Wednesday at 9pm SIN, 8pm JKT on National Geographic!

Photos & words by Kirsten Luce @kirstenluce | At Sriracha Tiger Zoo, in Chon Buri, Thailand, tigers are kept in small cages and taken out for photo ops. Captive tigers are speed bred and taken from their mothers at birth to ensure that there are always new, adorable cubs for visitors to handle.
Often, larger tigers are declawed and/or drugged in order to make it safe for them to pose with the steady stream of tourists who want photos with them.

For the June 2019 issue of National Geographic, writer @natashaldaly and I traveled the world to learn about wildlife tourism and the suffering that goes on behind the scenes. Our intention is not to shame tourists who have had these encounters but to arm our readers with information that will help them identify potentially abusive situations for animals.

To learn more, read our story at natgeo.com/wildlifetourism and follow @world_animal_protection which works to raise awareness and help animals in the tourism industry. | Repost from @natgeo

#OneStrangeAsia with @derryainsworth | “Bright Ideas” on the streets of Hanoi, Vietnam 🇻🇳

Photos & words by Kirsten Luce @kirstenluce | A four year-old male Asian elephant named Gluay Hom is found with a broken leg and open sores on his face underneath the stadium where other elephants perform at Samut Prakan Crocodile Farm and Zoo outside of Bangkok, Thailand. Over the course of a month looking at the elephant tourism industry in Thailand, this was the single worst case of neglect that we witnessed.

Our translator went back in December to check on this young elephant. Six months later, he was still languishing in the same condition. We hope that he gets the veterinary care that he needs.

For the June 2019 issue of National Geographic, writer @natashaldaly and I traveled the world to learn about wildlife tourism and the suffering that goes on behind the scenes. Our intention is not to shame tourists who have had these encounters but to arm our readers with information that will help them identify potentially abusive situations for animals.

To learn more, read our story at natgeo.com/wildlifetourism and follow @world_animal_protection which works to raise awareness and help animals in the tourism industry. // Post from @natgeo #wildlifetourism #elephant

#OneStrangeAsia with @sayacam.jp | Counting sheep in Gunma prefecture, Japan 🐑

These animals can survive in the most extreme environments, but they cannot survive in an environment filled with plastic waste. Watch #HostilePlanet on National Geographic TONIGHT at 9PM HKT/SIN, ‪8PM BKK/JKT, then learn more about how you can help make it a little less hostile by reducing single-use plastic from your daily life by taking the #PlanetorPlastic pledge.
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🌏 Pledge Link in Bio.
#IChoosePlanet #DontBeHostile

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