furkidsinhk Wishing everyone health and happiness in 2014. 6mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk HK InstaYay is running a fund raising campaign to show 'HONG KONG kaleidoscope' at the Very Hong Kong Festival. 'HONG KONG kaleidoscope' is a two-section photo exhibition by HK InstaYay members featuring snapshots of all things Hong Kong taken by an eclectic group with very diverse backgrounds, ages, nationalities and professions - showing the many facets of Hong Kong. We hope this exhibition could help in cultivating and increasing our appreciation of Hong Kong and its people.

Being a totally non-commercial, non-profit, labour-of-love kind of a project, we'd love your support! This fundraising system is all-or-nothing. If we don't reach the minimum goal by 10th December 2013, we won't receive any funding at all, so every contribution helps. To help or know more about the rewards for helping us make this happen, please visit
http://www.fringebacker.com/en/projects/hong_kong_kaleidoscope/

Meanwhile, the opening date will be on Saturday, 7 December 2013 at Dominion Garden, Wanchai, Hong Kong #veryhk_hkiyhkk #hkinstayay #veryhongkong #veryhk

A big thank you to our kind first class printers O-Live Decor, organizers Very Hong Kong for including us to be part of this city-wide art festival, and @fhung for planning, coordinating and overseeing our exhibition.

Lastly, apologies to all my IG friends for my extended absence and lack of replies, especially to my dear God-sis @trurogirl. I'll be back eventually, and as always wish everyone health and happiness.
7mon
  •   fhung Wishing you health and happiness too, Pete! 7mon
  •   furkidsinhk Thank you @fhung. See you tomorrow afternoon. 7mon
  •   fhung yay! See you!!! 7mon
  •   klyn2980 Good to hear from you and know you're well! We've definitely missed you! Merry Christmas in advance to you Debbie and the kids. Much love from us down under :) 7mon
  •   jaredbfries Congrats Pete! I won't make it tomorrow afternoon but I hope to see you around 7mon
  •   chucklesgram Good to see you back, @furkidsinhk ! 7mon
  •   trurogirl You are the Brother heaven has given to me, and you are always in my heart. Love you so very much 7mon
  •   redblueox Hope to see you around these parts sometime. 7mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk 24-38 Tonkin Street (東京街), Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong.
An area inhabited since at least the Neolithic period. Not far away lies the Han Dynasty Tomb that has been converted into a museum.

Much has changed here in Sham Shui Po (lit. Deep water pier) and the last decade has seen much demolition particularly of old Chinese buildings built 1940s-1960s. This building is the very last from that era on Tonkin Street, the last standing reminder of a way of life of that time, that will meet the same fate as the others in the immediate future.

I took this photo on what was once a nullah that started from the hills on the left, to the sea out of frame to the right. WW2 era bombs were found here during it's filling in, in April 2006.

These buildings have no name, and is listed simply as 24-38 Tonkin Street. They are made up of thirteen buildings standing side by side, the left building is 4-storeys tall, with a row of illegal rooftop housing made from tin sheet.

A last look at the last block of old buildings on Tonkin Street. And a farewell to the 'Ruby Shoes Manufacturer' (first floor), newspaper vendor, Chinese bonesetter, Doctors, noodle-maker, and the last of the 304 occupants. Though they will soon be gone, I hope they, the buildings on '24-38 Tonkin Street', and all that is genuinely Hong Kong will never be forgotten.

Hong Kong Buildings Part 126.

#hongkong
#hongkongstreetlife
10mon
  •   yeggi_ Thank you Pete for sharing. 10mon
  •   joemagers So cool! 10mon
  •   hoshiho Love so much 10mon
  •   tanyaya Super nice !! 10mon
  •   hsalnikow Love it 10mon
  •   trurogirl A travesty and a tragedy that historic HK's multi-use buildings are being destroyed! You are immortalizing them with your stunning portraits, my dearest Bro. I would love to have a book of these. Love you heaps 9mon
  •   magggieye Long time no see your pic !!! I miss your shots !!! 9mon
  •   tamarindeq miss your pictures so much 8mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

10mon furkidsinhk
Mayfair furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk 8-storey mixed-use residential building built 1961. 50 Un Chau Street, Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong.

#hongkongstreetlife #hongkong
10mon
  •   chucklesgram Havent seen ur post in ages! @furkidsinhk missed ur photos. And the irony of seeing your photo again when i just left hong kong (today)! 10mon
  •   hellomw Nice to see you again! 10mon
  •   jethromullen Yes! This is vintage FurKids. Love it. 10mon
  •   panglap A very furkids pic! 10mon
  •   zirosou long time no see!! 10mon
  •   ngchorguan Awesome! 10mon
  •   waychan Cool!! 10mon
  •   trurogirl Brings me back to when we first met here, my Bro. I came to adore HK's wonderful buildings because of these, your signature photos! Always stunning and filled with love for HK and respect for the past. Thank you for sharing your unique and special talent with all of us on IG. Love you 10mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

11mon furkidsinhk
Video furkidsinhk
  •   furkidsinhk Much thanks Neslin @nesln 11mon
  •   furkidsinhk Dor Jeh @ardisblossom 11mon
  •   furkidsinhk Thanks Jen. Why does next Summer seem so far away @jennihsurf 11mon
  •   furkidsinhk Thank you dearest sis. You're always so kind @trurogirl 11mon
  •   trurogirl It is easy to be kind to one as kind as you, my cherished bro 11mon
  •   joanlausc @furkidsinhk Maybe so but not many with as big a heart. And that counts more :) 11mon
  •   imj Thank you so much for bringing an experience of a serene morning in HK. Just want I needed before diving into another week of craziness at work. Awesome video. Love your post. 11mon
  •   chrisshentw How peaceful!!!! Love it!!!! 11mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

11mon furkidsinhk
Video furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk My home - fast and slow.

#hongkong
#timelapse

Dedicated to my dear God-sis @trurogirl
11mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

11mon furkidsinhk
Video furkidsinhk

» LOG IN to write comment.

11mon furkidsinhk
Video furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk Sunset and airplane trails, over Kwai Chung and Tsing Yi, Hong Kong.

#video
#hongkong
#timelapse
11mon
  •   jennihsurf 11mon
  •   lamma Hi Pete How have you been ? 11mon
  •   ilya389 Yes, all is well Pete. Instagramming a little :-) I hope, you are ok too :-) 11mon
  •   magggieye Wow ! Super ! 11mon
  •   sky100hk @furkidsinhk you are welcome. It's our pleasure that you are interested in shooting time lapse video at sky100. Let's explore the possibility of organizing #ig activity together with @hkinstayay 11mon
  •   trurogirl I adore this, my dearest Bro!! No one does time-lapse as well as you Hoping you are OK; sending you much always. I think of you each day 11mon
  •   hsalnikow Hi @furkidsinhk I just wanted to let you know that your Instagram videos inspired me to create a #Timelapse_HK hashtag. I absolutely love all your timelapses and I'd be thrilled to have you consider adding your collection to the hashtag and hopefully spreading it so that other people with other perspectives of HK start creating their own I'm still learning and (hopefully) getting better but yours are just brilliant 10mon
  •   rmckinney866 Wow, isn't this beautiful! @kimmikitty123 3mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

11mon furkidsinhk
Video furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk Video.
Kowloon, Hong Kong sunset.

#hongkong
11mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk Reclaimed land (part 2). Much of Kowloon Bay was, like parts of Kwai Fong, originally the sea. And again, sharing something else with Kwai Fong, is that it also had a bay nicknamed "Lap Sap Wan" (Refuse Bay) as it too was used as a landfill and consequently reclaimed.

Reclamation was done in several stages, mostly from the 1930's till the 1970's.

A popular brand of Chinese condiment manufacturer called Amoy Canning Food Ltd, moved their production plant from Xiamen in mainland China to here in 1924, the catalyst to what made Kowloon Bay (and nearby Kwun Tong) an industrial area.

In the 1980's, the original site was redeveloped into the present day residential estate, Amoy Gardens.

Like much of Hong Kong, the land here was owned mostly by farmers and villagers, passed down generation after generation. Since the colonialization by the British, to the handover back to China and to the present day, land owners are no more the poor and simple farmers, but rather two consecutive nations, property tycoons and billionaire investors from the mainland.

#repost
#discoverhongkong
#hongkong
12mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

12mon furkidsinhk
Normal furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk Once upon a tide.

Skyline of (part of) Kwai Fong. Currently mainly residential mixed with smaller industrial areas.

All the buildings here were built no earlier than 1960's, as this was still (including where I am standing) a part of Gin Drinkers Bay. Only one building (pink building centre) from that period can be seen here.

Gin Drinkers Bay was called 'Lap Sap Wan' by the local Chinese. 'Lap Sap Wan' literally meant 'Rubbish Bay'. Tsing Yi island stands a few kilometres to my left, separated from the mainland here by a narrow stretch of water called Rambler Channel. An August 1905 map of Hong Kong by the (British) War Office shows that there were three small islands that was linked to be part of the mainland by reclamation. Locals may be surprised to know they were called Ping Chau and Cheung Chau - of which are the same names of two other islands south of Hong Kong. These two islands are now the outer stretches supporting two bridges connecting the mainland with Tsing Yi (Tsing Tsuen Road/Bridge and Tsing Yi Bridge, respectively). I am standing here with @panglap. We watch planes flying low, on their approach to the airport some distance away. We see, then lose sight of them, and see them again flying behind the buildings.

Any of the passengers looking out their window would see what were once green gentle waves, now replaced by green blades of grass.

Home for Tanka fishermen and their families moored here in their fishing junks a century ago, it is home now to 20,000 of todays Hong Kong people, in what was once a little bay called 'Lap Sap Wan'. #discoverhongkong
#hongkong
12mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

12mon furkidsinhk
Normal furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk 'Happiness is like a cat, If you try to coax it or call it, it will avoid you; it will never come. But if you pay no attention to it and go about your business, you'll find it rubbing against your legs and jumping into your lap.' William Bennett

#discoverhongkong
#hongkong
12mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

12mon furkidsinhk
Normal furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk "Of rainbows after showers,
Of starlight nights so still;
Of moonbeams shimmering softly,
O'er every brook and rill;
Of mornings dawning sweetly,
O'er dew wet grass and flowers;
Oh! Summertime is only,
A life of golden hours." Mary Dow Brine

#discoverhongkong
#hongkong
12mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk Typical residential buildings commonly found in Hong Kong.

Name: Hisbiscus Park (Blocks 1 & 2)
Occupation Date: August 1998
Height: 35 floors
Units: 420
Units per floor: 6

Almost half the population of Hong Kong, or around 3.5 million people, reside in heavily government subsidised housing.

These twin buildings belong to one of 12 other under the Sandwich Class Housing Scheme - developments that provide housing for lower-middle and middle-income residents.

The much shorter buildings behind and behind-left make up Kwai Shing West Estate - typical housing under the Public Rental Housing Scheme. 10 blocks were built and completed between 1975-1977. Buildings under this scheme provide housing for the low-income residents.

I've witnessed public housing buildings grow from 5-storeys (1956), to 50-storeys, as the government tries to cope with housing demands in land-scarce Hong Kong.

Though those from 1956 cease to exist, and older slab designs such as Kwai Shing West Estate are awaiting or being replaced, these are the type of housing that bring me the fondest memories, and a place to reminisce old Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Buildings Part 124

#discoverhongkong
#hongkong
1y

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk I saw two clouds at morning
Tinged by the rising sun,
And in the dawn they floated on
And mingled into one. - John Gardiner Calkins Brainard

#discoverhongkong
#hongkong
1y

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk Hong Kong Buildings Part 123

The Mong Kok Fire Station located at the junction of Prince Edward Road West and Tong Mei Road.

Established in 1952, it is the Divisional Headquarters of the Kowloon West Division. The 6-bay fire station has a force of 130 and on average, handles 120 fire calls and 1107 ambulance calls per month.

This old and modest structure appeals to me more than any of the other new, modern ones surrounding it.

#discoverhongkong
#hongkong
1y

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk Hong Kong Buildings Part 122.

5 storey buildings in Tai Kok Tsui, Hong Kong. The building (centre to right, built September 1958) stands on 1-15 Fuk Tsun Road. The pink building (behind left, built December 1959) stands on 2, 2A and 2B Anchor Street. Both cover a total of 726 square metres.

An area, in 1860, where Hong Kong's Chinese population gathered and stood beside the sea prior to extensive reclamation not long after the cession of Kowloon to the British. Large numbers of warehouses and dockyards replaced the rural farmland. These include the Cosmopolitan Dock (later acquired in 1880 by the Hong Kong and Whampoa Dock Co. Ltd). In 1920, a shipyard owned by the Hong Kong and Yaumatei Ferry Co. Ltd. was built.

Building of these 2 roads began in 1899. In the early days, Tai Kok Tsui was accessible only by ferry from a pier situated in a nearby typhoon shelter.

From 1907 onwards till the 1960s, the area turned into Hong Kong's major industrial district. It was during the mid-1950s that various apartment-style buildings were erected. These two are among the last from that era.

Scheduled to be torn down in the coming months, all of its residential units are now empty, as are the small, family-run shops and clinics on the ground floor. And soon, the last of old Tai Kok Tsui will be gone forever.

#hongkong
#discoverhongkong
#taikoktsui
1y
  •   trurogirl Such a tragedy...these mixed-use structures are the lifeblood of a city, to be replaced by sterile, soulless buildings!! When will HK realize that destroying the past is not 'progress'? Sad news, my dear Bro 1y
  •   chiseen Sad to hear 1y
  •   dotzsoh 1y
  •   ponytail23 Oh... there will be one less old building to look up at 1y
  •   kohji405mi16 welcome back, building series! 1y
  •   hoshiho I agree with trurogirl...sad news indeed! 1y
  •   zirosou 1y
  •   moss_man It is a beautiful building and I always enjoyed walking past it on the way home. It is a true shame that Hong Kongs Urban Development direction seems to be completely unaware of just how unique and charming all of these buildings from the 20-50's really are. Would be a really cool area to renovate. 12mon

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk “If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man.” - Mark Twain

A friendly fisherdog in Tai O. He'd swim out to bite and catch small fish swimming in this sea that narrows into a river metres to the right, where stilt houses line both banks.

Collab with @panglap

#hongkong
#discoverhongkong
#taio
1y

» LOG IN to write comment.

Normal furkidsinhk
furkidsinhk Hong Kong Buildings Part 121.

A public housing building called 'Kai King Lau', the tallest of 8 that make up Cho Yiu Estate.

Construction of the estate began in 1976, covering 799,227 sq. ft. It contains 2,532 units of sizes from 166.99-766.40 sq. ft.

This building is 38 storeys in height and construction was completed in 1979, and was the tallest public housing building in the world at the time.

Designed by the P&T Group (formerly known as Palmer and Turner Hong Kong), their origins date back to 1868. Responsible for the design of many of Hong Kong's buildings, from St Peter's Church (1872), the Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank (1883), Hong Kong Club (1887) and the Chartered Bank (1894), to the present day Exchange Square, Landmark, Ruttonjee Centre and Olympic Station, to name a few.

They were also responsible for changing the skyline of other Asian cities. Among them are Singapore (Singapore Land Tower, Standard Chartered Bank building, AIA Tower, Phoenix Tower, Reuters Computer Centre, Tampines Neighbourhood 4), Malaysia (The Palace at Johor Bahru 1939), and Shanghai (the infamous Peace Hotel 1932). I was pleasantly surprised to find the background behind this humble public housing building that hundreds call home and, including myself whenever I walk past, rarely paid any attention to, and probably more so thankful to the 145 year old architectural firm, for helping shape and make Hong Kong what it was, and is today.

#hongkong
#discoverhongkong
#choyiuestate
#choyiuchuen
1y
  •   rambler15 I love Cho Yiu as well! The space & community design is so incomparable to recently-built so-called estates/gardens/whatever 1y
  •   zirosou that's company was designed BANK in YOKOHAMA,JAPAN. 1y
  •   looking_glass I love that you give the back story to your pictures. It is always well researched and succinctly delivered with a slice of your thoughts. A nice balance. Thank you for taking the time to share. And I'm back =) 1y
  •   fhung What a history! Impressive architectural firm! Thanks, Pete! 1y
  •   ponytail23 Your building series is back, hurray!! 1y
  •   trurogirl Can I tell you something?? It makes me SO happy to see your iconic shots of HK buildings and to read your fascinating commentary!! I am in awe of you, dearest Bro 1y
  •   joemagers Nice! Informative commentary. 1y
  •   musicdizzie Wish I could go 1y

» LOG IN to write comment.

furkidsinhk Three hundred and sixty homes. One sky.

Looking up from the middle of Lok Yiu House.

One of 5 buildings that make up Lai Yiu Public Housing Estate. This was the first public housing estate in Hong Kong to receive piped gas (1976). Two of these buildings are joined joined at its corners to resemble a figure 8 from above. There are 16 units to each floor in this 20 storey building. Ground floor units are mostly shops or private clinics. A tenant would have 15 families as their neighbours, living beside and directly opposite them. Because of the proximity to one another, and that many households prefer to leave their doors open (for more air circulation), this generally brought about a far friendlier, closer knit and unpretentious community compared to the modern buildings of today.

A few buildings of this design still survive in several other public housing estates, dotted around the territory, such as Oi Man Estate- a favourite for many local Instagramers.

Because of these building's old age (by Hong Kong's standards), it is likely, and unfortunate, that they will be demolished to make way for newer structures in the not too distant future, taking with it a way of life, a close community, and a part of old Hong Kong.

Some say modernization is inevitable, unavoidable. But is designing buildings in a way that distances people from one another, inevitable and unavoidable too? Designs can only be based on aesthetics (and profit) and not community? I disagree.

Hong Kong Buildings Part 120.

#hongkong
#discoverhongkong
1y
  •   kel_hk22 I had the same impression, Candy! @panglap 1y
  •   kagrace A photo with meaning and heart. I can feel it hear it when I see it. @furkidsinhk 1y
  •   rambler15 can't agree more ... That's pitiful 1y
  •   joemagers Amazing! 1y
  •   trurogirl Amazing image, dearest Bro! So emblematic of HK, and sadly, a way of life that is being replaced by 'progress'...exactly the issue which brought me to your incredible photos and stories. No one tells HK's stories like you 1y
  •   angushoyin Great to read your write up again Pete 1y
  •   chucklesgram An amazing photo! @furkidsinhk 1y

» LOG IN to write comment.